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Thread: Joli's Law

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default Joli's Law

    I've started extracting...about three weeks ahead of my normal schedule this year. Every time I extract, I am reminded of something Joli Winer (of www.heartlandhoney.com) stated, and stated with such authority that it should be made an inviolate law:

    "Never turn your back on a bucket being filled from an extractor."

    There was a time in my life when I did not know of this law, and several buckets easily overflowed into a huge puddle on the floor. You'd think I'd learn! Does anyone know how to clean up this mess? What a waste of honey, and then how do I move this brim-filled bucket?

    This law comes with another bit of advice, a sage axiom I call, "Cecil's Correlary."

    "There's more honey in that extractor than you think!"

    I never turn my back on a bucket being filled from an extractor, and if I do of if I turn my attention to something else, I close the honey gate on the extractor.

    Been there, had it happen.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,297

    Angry Re: Joli's Law

    Scoop it up with a clean dust pan then wash the rest off the floor with plain water. Don't ask how I know but 1/2 of a 55 gallon barrel is a lot of scooping and washing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Kirkland, WA, USA
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    As I've said before:
    One word of warning about the honey gate – never, never, never turn your back on the honey gate. That small piece of molded plastic is evil. If you have extracted 85 pounds of honey, and set a filter bucket under the gate, and opened it, do not turn away for a second. Not even if a bee stings you in the palm. Not even if you step backwards into the space heater that’s warming the room. Not even if you lunge forward into the table holding the supers, shaking your hand while rubbing your leg. Because if you do…the honey, in that moment will pile up faster than the laws of gravity should allow. You’ll lunge for the gate and wind up honey coated, bee stung, burnt, and mashed. You do not even want to know how I know this.
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Montgomery County, MD, USA
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    Quote Originally Posted by fish_stix View Post
    1/2 of a 55 gallon barrel is a lot of scooping and washing.
    Wow, that really is a lot of scooping and washing, I hope the bees got a stab at whatever was scooped up

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Elkton, Giles, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    1,339

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    Whenever the wife's sister came to help, honey spills were commonplace. Resorted to putting a sheet of plastic under the bucket with the edges turned up by framing with 2X4s, creating a pool. Minor spills are contained. Assuming the bucket is clean on inside and out, that caught in the pool is both retrievable and marketable.

    Honey house design tip:
    Put a layer of crushed rock below the concrete slab to absorb the input from a central drain to the crushed rock. No sewage outlet required. For the spills that get away, flush to the central floor drain.

    Walt
    Free advice is often overpriced.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,235

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    The only way to clean up a lot of spilled honey is using Kitty Litter. Layer it on, and keep adding it until the top layer stays dry overnight. Then use a spatula to scrape it up.

    No dripping, no honey strings following you. When you are done, there will be a microscopic layer left on the ground to wash up with a brush and water.

    Fuzzy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Battle Ground, Wa
    Posts
    198

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    Well, I got careless once & spilled a full gallon jar of honey onto the floorboards of my truck as I was driving. I double check the lids now! When people mention a sticky mess, I know I've seen worse. Cleanup was easy. Drive over by the beeyard, open the truck doors & come back after dark. That way there was almost no waste & the bees had more winter stores. I would think it would work for cleaning up a honey house too, although you might need to open or cover any windows.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    Honey has a way of getting into concrete and fermenting.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Valley Center, CA
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: Joli's Law

    Our extractor pumps into an 800 gallon heated tank to be loaded into barrels. Company policy, as sternly my employer informed me, is that the person loading barrels NEVER leaves the valve unattended. If it is open, your eyes are on it.

    This is a 4" pipe fitting coming from the tank to a gate valve. It fills a 55 gallon barrel of warm honey in a hurry. It makes a mess that can never be described even quicker.
    Last edited by Terry Small, Jr; 06-22-2009 at 01:07 AM. Reason: Clarification
    KI6FCI

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