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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bucksport, Maine
    Posts
    177

    Default Angled Top Bars - Quick and Easy

    A quick and easy way to make top bars with an angled comb guide is to use corner molding. Here is how I do it. First I make 17 inch top bars with no kerf (not needed) out of inch stock. Then I cut 12 inch pieces of hardwood corner (cove) molding that I get at Lowe’s. Center the molding then glue and screw or glue and nail it to the top bar. I use an electric brad nailer and waterproof carpenter’s glue on mine. The bees are building on them nicely and I’m pleased with the results. I waxed the edge of the molding but on the advice of Michael Bush I’m not waxing them in the future. Another thing I like about this method is that you can buy just 1-8 foot piece of molding at a time if you like.
    Last edited by DavesBees; 06-03-2009 at 06:51 PM. Reason: bakerboy gave me the proper name for the molding

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SNOHOMISH, WA, USA
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Great tip and one that I would never have considered.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Red Hook Ny
    Posts
    99

    Default similar, not quite so easy

    I have been using 3/4 '' cove molding. I plane the curved bits flat, flip it over and glue, brad and go.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    259

    Default

    Beefool,

    I think I am in love!
    your idea gives me hope of someday having top bar frames with natural comb.

    thanks,
    Noelle

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bucksport, Maine
    Posts
    177

    Default

    bakerboy,
    I think that is what I’m using. It is ” on 2 sides and 1” on the curved side. I run my glue along the bits you are cutting off. This may be a unnecessary step since mine seem to work fine.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bucksport, Maine
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Noelle,
    Take it easy now. You may die of infatuation saturation when you find out how easy they are to make. And since I already made it past the hope stage for you; you can skip hope and go straight to success.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bucksport, Maine
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Dave,
    Checked out your blog.
    Don’t want to get all “tight throat and water eye” on ya but when I scrolled down and saw Anna working in her hive….. well it warmed my heart.
    Great job to both of you.
    Dave

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Red Hook Ny
    Posts
    99

    Default same difference

    Beefool

    I thought you were using a thin flat corner trim I had seen. We are using the same thing. I think I only plane it because my dremel tool came with a planer attachment, which is very handy for a few jobs. I know that wood glue likes a flat surface, but between the glue and the brads and the bees I really can't see it going anywhere.

    I build my hives rough and ready, this is the one picky thing I do. No fancy roof, no paint, no screened bottom, no observation window, no fancy entrance or landing boards. It's a dag-durned box full of bees !

    I made the triangles for my first hive with a carpenter friend who said 'oh that's easy . we just set one table saw at 45˚ and the other at 90˚. Hmm two table saws ?

    This molding idea makes it very easy to crank out a hive after dinner.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Default

    You can buy chamfer molding. If they don't have it in stock at the lumber yard, they can order it. It's exactly what you want already and usually cheaper than fancy moldings as it's usually used in concrete forms etc.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Thanks for the tip - at about $3 for 8' it's more expensive than popsicle sticks, but if it will help get my girls to stop making cross-bar comb, I'm in!

    Doug
    Last edited by Bizzybee; 06-10-2009 at 02:56 PM. Reason: Unnecessary quoting

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX USA
    Posts
    133

    Default

    Any chance of getting someone to post a picture or two of the moldings ya'll are talking about?
    Not a real molding smart kind of guy here.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Default

    The cross section of the Chamfer is a simple isosceles triangle. The cross section of the cove molding is the same except for a fancy curved part that shows when you use it as molding, but I would guess this is going against the top bar.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bucksport, Maine
    Posts
    177

    Default As Good As A Photo

    Quote Originally Posted by frysl View Post
    Any chance of getting someone to post a picture or two of the moldings ya'll are talking about?
    Not a real molding smart kind of guy here.
    Go to the moulding area of Lowes and look at the moulding. I was in there today and they actually have pictures of the moulding with the name on the display. I used the cove moulding and glued the curved side to the top bar. I have not located the chamfer moulding the Michael is talking about yet. It is more expensive than popsicle sticks but no saw kerf and I get to keep my fingers.
    Dave

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