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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Butler, Mo.
    Posts
    2

    Default Hive with no frames!

    I'm new and I'm glad I found this forum. I have lots of questions. I only have 3 swarms and have an oppurtunity to get another swarm. The problem is this swarm was caught in a hive without frames. They have been in there for 2 years and the guy that caught wants rid of them. I was thinking of putting a brood box on top and somehow capping them off and moving them home. Is there hope? I have not attempted to open the hive to see what I'm up against.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,741

    Default

    You should try to get it open and peek, but my guess would be to treat it like a cutout. You can rubber band the comb into frames and then install the frames like you would any other hive. If you did that, you could handle the "cutout" on site and then leave a box for the stragglers. Shouldn't take long. If I were doing it, I'd bring all the gear and then take a look. If it looked good, proceed from there. If not, you can always go back.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,379

    Default

    Flip the box upside down. Run a knife around the outside edge. Remove the box. Do a cutout. Try a search and you'll find many pictures of a cut out. Basically you cut all the comb out and use rubber bands to hold it into empty wood frames.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tulare County, CA USA
    Posts
    1,380

    Default

    Add a super with at least one frame of drawn foundation. Wait until the queen finds it or dig into the bottom box and find her and then put an excluder in between the two hive bodies with the queen on top. Once all the brood hatches separate them and let them rob the lower box until all you have left is comb.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,694

    Default

    They've lasted for 2 years without frames - they can last another year or two that way.

    If it were me, I would add boxes above the old hive. When the bees move up over the winter, remove the bottom box. If there are two frameless boxes fused together with comb, I would use a wood handsaw to cut the comb between the boxes so I could separate them.

    This hive might also be a candidate for drumming.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Leonard, Texas
    Posts
    16

    Default

    This hive might also be a candidate for drumming.

    Drumming????
    If at first you don't succeed, skydiving may not be for you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Butler, Mo.
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thanks for all the replies. I am going to pry the lid off this weekend and see what I have to deal with. I'm in no hurry to move them and may try putting brood box on top and let them move up, That cut out thing sounds overwhelming for my experience, but I may decide to go that way if it doesn't look to complicated when I get in there. Thanks again.........

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,694

    Default

    This hive might also be a candidate for drumming.

    Drumming????


    Drumming is an old time method for getting bees to abscond a bee gum. Turn the hive upside down. Place a brood box right side up on the top of it. Drum the side of the hive vigorously with a stick or rubber mallet. At first the bees will become very agitated, but after 8-10 minutes they will move up into the top box (or abscond).

    You can also drive the bees out of the box with Bee-Q or another bee repellent and a fume board.

    After you have removed the bees from the old hive, dismantle the hive and cut out any brood comb, and rubberband it into empty frames. Doing a cutout on combs without the bees is much easier than doing a cutout on combs covered in bees.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Chilhowee, MO
    Posts
    94

    Default

    if the comb is attached to the top. why not lift the hive box and top and put it on top of another hive body.. with frames and comb.. and once you see the queen down there.. put a excluder on to keep her from going back up.. wait a month or so fpr everyone to hatch out and remove the old box and cut out the old comb and put in new frames..
    Smart man knows that the road is a one way street..
    Wise man looks both ways anyhow.......

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR, USA
    Posts
    144

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Hills, CA USA
    Posts
    453

    Default Box Of Combs

    Bbyod, YOU DO NOT not have an unsermountable problen hive at your finger tips. Over comming situations like yours I think is the fun in beekeeping as long as you learn from your experience and don't have to do it over and over. Follow one of the above suggestions but remember that all of the comb in the top box is very firmly attached to the cover and some to the sides.
    Walt

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