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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Duluth MN USA
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    Default How to destroy a hive

    I have a nuc hive I bought a few weeks ago and it is too agressive for me. What is the best way to destroy the hive. I do not want to requeen and wait a month for new gentler bees. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Brown County, IN
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    2,032

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    Have you contacted whomever you bought the nuc from? Most of the local suppliers I know would be glad to take it back and provide you a replacement. It's not good for their reputation if they're selling nucs with aggressive bees. If not, do you know any nearby beekeepers? Perhaps one could swap you some gentler bees, i.e., another beek could put it in an outyard and requeen.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Ennis, TX USA
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    Give it to someone in your area that will requeen it.
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I've never destroyed a hot hive. I always requeen them. I never put up with them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    Requeening can (and often does) change the behavior
    almost immediately.

    I agree with Indy....... contact the seller and they may
    very well shoot you a new queen.

    Or ship it to me for rehab......

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol,MA,USA
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    728

    Default

    Soapy water spray. I don't believe that it will contaminate the equipment. But you could make some beekeeper really happy by giving the frames to him for replacement frames. OMTCW

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
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    Default

    Why do you have to wait a month if you re-queen? As others have said it should change the disposition of the hive right away...and if you get a laying queen you have lost no time.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Claremont, NH, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    Why do you have to wait a month if you re-queen? As others have said it should change the disposition of the hive right away...and if you get a laying queen you have lost no time.
    My guess is he is saying that the bees that are now in the hive have the aggressive disposition and so the hive will be aggressive until they die off. Just guessing.

    Bill
    “If you want to gather honey, don't kick over the beehive.” - Dale Carnegie

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default

    >Requeening can (and often does) change the behavior
    almost immediately.


    That has been my experience. It is, of course, inconsistent with the theory that it is all about genetics, but it is still what I see often.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Claremont, NH, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >Requeening can (and often does) change the behavior
    almost immediately.


    That has been my experience. It is, of course, inconsistent with the theory that it is all about genetics, but it is still what I see often.
    Could it be that the 'smell' of the new queen, and maybe the new brood, has a calming influence? Sort of an 'all's right with the world' effect?

    Bill
    “If you want to gather honey, don't kick over the beehive.” - Dale Carnegie

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default

    >Could it be that the 'smell' of the new queen, and maybe the new brood, has a calming influence? Sort of an 'all's right with the world' effect?

    That has always been my best guess.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Duluth MN USA
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    Default

    Thank you all for your responses. I did mean that the foragers would continue to be agressive through their short life. It seems odd to me that the bees would become gentler once they are requeened, but beekeeping isn't always logical according to my thinking. That's what makes beekeeping so great. I will try requeening. You may have saved me some money and bees. Thanks alot.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
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    I had one really mean hive a couple of years ago. I finally found the queen and gave her the hive tool test. She failed. 5 minutes later they settled right down, without a new queen. Sometimes it may be the old queen's smell, not the new one.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >Sometimes it may be the old queen's smell, not the new one.

    Wow! I never thought of that. I figured it was the old queen's LACK of some pheromone.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    central mn
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    273

    Default

    if you requeen and they remain hot ,and or are still going to destory the hive let me know ....
    If things are not going fast like they are now ,, I will come get them .. I don't like to see hives destroyed ... but hope requeening will smooth them out so you can work with them , so you can enjoy your coming bee addiction ..

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South San Ysidro, NM
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    503

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    ...I finally found the queen and gave her the hive tool test. She failed...
    So, what is "the hive tool test"? Just curious.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    St. Clair Co. Missouri
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    225

    Default

    Ardilla Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ross
    ...I finally found the queen and gave her the hive tool test. She failed...

    So, what is "the hive tool test"? Just curious.

    I am assuming that it means I stabbed her with the hive tool and she died, therefore failing the test..
    Charla Hinkle

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
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    Default

    Yep, I've never had a queen actually pass the hive tool test

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Anderson County, Texas
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    On March 20 I purchased 2 colonies of bees. These were alleged to be Buckfast bees. One colony was gentle (unmarked queen, which I had previously examined), the other colony (which I had not examined), was extremely vicious. You could not stand 20 yards in front of these bees to observe them without getting stung or accosted by an ever increasing mob of bees. I went in to try to find the queen to kill, but was covered up by virtually the whole colony. I was stung probably over 100 times. I had hat, veil, long blue jeans, and long sleeve shirt. Some crawled up my pants legs, some stung thru my pants, and some even crawled under my veil and stung me.

    I returned a couple of days later (with renewed determination) and just split the colony (two deeps), and moving the heaviest, deep to a new location. The whole time I was getting mauled. I provided each split with a marked MHQ in a cage with sugar candy plug. These queens were from a migratory beekeeper that was making nucs and preparing to go north. I bought three laying queens (breeders from the prior year that he was using for breeders). (I also split the gentle colony with the third queen).

    In one colony the MHQ took (the one without the original queen). This colony continued being vicious, until just recently, which I assume was because most of the original bees have died.

    The other colony (about 5 days later after the queen had been released) (now with reduced population because of the split), I smoked, sprayed with sugar syrup, and worked through for about 30 minutes till I found an unmarked queen. This colony had eggs and brood of every stage. When I found the queen, I killed her, and ordered a new queen. Early part of April when I got the new queen, I went back in when the new queen arrived and destroyed all the queen cells and again requeened.

    You still get accosted by a few bees from this colony but I assume these are from the last surviving workers. Though the population is greatly reduced, they seem much gentler now. I don't have any doubt that the original queen was an AHB.

    Neither the addition of new queens, nor the killing of the old queen seemed to make any difference in their viciousness. I attribute, the milder state only to the loss of vicious workers.

    Danny

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default

    >Neither the addition of new queens, nor the killing of the old queen seemed to make any difference in their viciousness. I attribute, the milder state only to the loss of vicious workers.

    There are certainly hives like that as well. They don't surprise me as that was what I expected, the surprising ones are the ones that instantly calm down with a new queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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