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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    1,716

    Default Couple of Newbee questions.

    Are the bees we keep "domesticated" or are they considered wild animals?

    I have been mowing around my hive (5 frame nuc in a medium box) since I got it 2 weeks ago. I can get within 5 feet of the entrance without incedence; however, I am not sure how long I can keep that up as the colony grows bigger and more self assured. Can I put a screen over the hive entrance at night and then mow near the hive?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    renton,washington
    Posts
    8

    Default

    well on your land domesticated when they are of or over your fence they are wild so in case someone trys to sue you, perfect answer at least that is what i am going to say but i am not any legal person

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Getting near the hive "without incidence" has a lot to do with the time of year and foraging conditions and not so much to do with size. If there is an abundance of pollen and nectar to gather then you can do almost anything short of smashing/swatting at them and they probably will not bother you. You will probably notice this during your inspections while there is a flow on. But if/when you go back to take the excess honey during a dearth of nectar you will think the little darlings have become posessed by pure evil.

    I mow and trim right up to the front of my hives without waiting until evening or closing them in. Other things besides a dearth will affect the temperment of the hive (queenlessness, robbing) but you should be able to use your back yard almost exactly as you always have and not be bothered by your bees.
    Carl

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,694

    Default

    Bees are not animals - domesticated or wild. They are insects.

    Bees are wild insects. They are not tame.

    Ownership of bees has been an issue for most of recorded history. Under common law, you own the hive, and the contents of the hive. As hive owner, you are allowed to profit from the honey inside the hive. You do not own the bees the moment they leave your hive. (As wild creatures, they are free to leave.) For example, you are not allowed to trespass on your neighbor's land to retrieve a swarm that left your hive.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    1,716

    Default

    My back yard is 1 acre and it backs up to 10 acres of open land so I figure I have just enough room for a hive, or two. At first the kidz refused to go out in the back yard (or even talk to me for that matter), but now nobody hardly notices the bees. I have been battling spring rains lately and trying to keep up with the mowing. So far no problems at all (and I have been mowing 2 to 3 times a week).. My mower is pretty fast and every time I swing by the hive I watch it really close and wonder how fast a the bees can vacate the hive and come after me. I guess I dont really ever want to know the answer to that question. I think that I will suit up when I get the weed wacker out for trimming the grass that I cant get with the mower (and then only when it is really high, like 3 feet). I have been wonder what to do if the mowing does start to bother them.....

    As far as working at night, why is that a bad thing? Arent the bees sleepy and cold. I am thinking how snakes and spiders and other cold-blooded biting/stinging things cant do much until they warm up in the sun a little.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default

    It all depends on their mood....I have mowed many time w/o a problem, other times they will come out and headbutt the mower and still other times....well wearing a veil is a must.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Lovell, WY, USA
    Posts
    223

    Default

    I have 2 hives with about 5 feet of grass between the hives and the garden. I am putting some paver stones down so I won't have to mow directly in front of them,

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    west point, ms
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Just pour out a sack of salt around the hive and you will not have to mow.
    Don't think you are on the right road simply because it is a well worn pathway.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted n Ms View Post
    Just pour out a sack of salt around the hive and you will not have to mow.
    Personally I would rather mow then work the hives standing in mud but that is just me.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Woodlawn, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    328

    Default

    From experience I can say that they 1)do not like having the grass clippings thrown into their hive and 2) do not like for the motor's exhaust to blow into their hive. Only problem I have ever had (even during a dearth) was when I broke one of those two rules.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South San Ysidro, NM
    Posts
    503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nabber86 View Post
    ... So far no problems at all (and I have been mowing 2 to 3 times a week)...
    2 to 3 times a week? I think you could cut back on the fertilizer!

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