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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    wyoming,new york.usa
    Posts
    77

    Default tbh queen raising

    Hello, Is there any system in tbh bee keeping raising queens for your self. Like these other methods I read about. I would like to raise my own queens to re queen if need be or start other tbh. Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Default

    Pretty much like any other system, except the equipment is harder to use . Use a divider board in a full-size TBH to make it into a nuc-sized rearer that can grow a split into a colony. If you want to make a few queens, you'll definitely want to make some queenrearing nucs out of TBH-type equipment, or maybe divider boards and multiple entrances in a long TBH. But if you're just wanting to rear a new queen for a second colony, make a split as you would with a lang (that is, crowded with lots of young housebees, plenty of stores and some eggs) and after she's emerged and mated you're queeney. Or take the capped cells and introduce them to multiple splits if you want more'n one.

    IMO it's more important to learn about good queenrearing techniques first, then you can apply the principles to rearing them in whatever kind of box, trough, or gas tank you want. The bees have the same drives and instincts whatever shape colony they're in, and it's their behavior that rears queens. Michael Bush's page has good queenrearing info, as does Dave Cushman's.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honduras
    Posts
    228

    Default

    Ben gives some good advice.

    I tried some queen raising two years ago. I wanted something simple (no grafting) so I used a method where basically you cut some strips of comb containing eggs and tie them to a bar. In this case I used one of my Tanzanian-type top bar nuc/trap hive boxes and made the bees queenless. I took one of the frames I made for these boxes, added an extra bar, and then attached the strips of comb containing the eggs. I got queen cells which I later introduced into some nucs.

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...eenrearing.jpg

    If you use the trapezoidal-shaped boxes, you would probably just tie a strip to a top bar, maybe use even two or three different bars with comb.

    The cell building itself went ok. The nucs didnít. My Africanized bees donít make things easy. I think I made them too small and had drifting since they were left somewhat close to some other big hives.

    This year I made some nucs and just left the bees raise their own queens. It takes longer before you have a laying queen and brood hatching but it can work. My advantage is that I donít have to overwinter them. If I make them late and they are still small by the time the blooms are over here, I can keep them on syrup with out a problem and keep them growing.

    ----------
    Tom

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Default

    Probably the simplest that lends itself well to TBHs is the Miller method:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmillermethod.htm

    Here's the basics of queen rearing:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm

    And several other queen rearing books if you want to read more:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesoldbooks.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    wyoming,new york.usa
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Thank you for all the help.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Minerva, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    69

    Default

    Here's a good article by Marty Hardison "Queen rearing in top bar hives":

    http://www.beesfordevelopment.org/in...top-bar-.shtml

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