Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,623

    Default Cutout/tying comb

    thought i'd post this here.

    last week, ramona and i did a fairly easy cutout:


    i didn't have time to put together "swarm ketching frames" (as dee lusby uses...1/2 width frames with horizontal wires...comb is sandwiched between 2 1/2 frames and they are stapled together), so i quickly put together the style that i saw jim tew use in a video:


    more detailed pics:
    http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/TewFrame#

    deknow

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default

    That is the best idea I have seen for tieing comb without useing the "catch" frames GOOD JOB
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,623

    Default

    yeah, i like it too...i'll have to look up the data on the video so i can credit it properly. the real key is the rubber band...this avoids having to tie a knot and keep the string taut.

    dee's "swarm ketching frames" are better for piecing together several smaller combs on one frame (she does cutouts from flowerpot style traps, so lots of small combs), but if you are working with larger single combs (this colony had setup shop in an old, walled over stove vent pipe section...9 round combs perpendicular to the pipe), this is pretty fast.

    one could modify it by putting hooks on the underside of the topbar closer to the center widthwise so that it would hold the comb more tightly, but the real beauty of this is the simplicity...if you have string, nails, rubber bands, and frames, you are all set...and once the bees build out the comb, you only have some small nails that do not interfere with the frame spacing.

    btw, more pics of the cutout at:
    http://picasaweb.google.com/Dean.Ramona/Cutoutdevins#
    ...i'll shoot some more pics of the colony now (perhaps today), with some kind of comb size gauge...the cells and the bees were quite small.

    deknow

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,623

    Default

    also, these were frames for foundationless, so they also had popsicle stick comb guides. 3 days after the cutout, they had the comb mostly attached via the combguides (and in the center of the frames).

    don't know if the guides help, hurt, or are benign...i wouldn't have bothered with them if i were building them specifically for tying up comb.

    deknow

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default

    the real key is the rubber band...this avoids having to tie a knot and keep the string taut.
    Yes I saw the rubberband and the PC sticks.

    ...i'll have to look up the data on the video so i can credit it properly
    I wont ell if you dont I dont have orginal ideas but like to try to burn good ones into the hard head drive.
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,623

    Default

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=228503

    You can see progress the cutout is making, and more.

    deknow

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Auburn and Tri-Cities Washington
    Posts
    334

    Default

    I like your idea but I take it one or two steps further to simplify. I just use rubber bands. That way all you need is an empty frame and some rubber bands. No string, nails, or preassembly required. You just put the rubber bands around the frame vertically. You can use as many or as few as you need. The bees will chew them out but not until they have attached the comb securely to the frame.
    \"The man who sets out to carry a cat by its tail learns something that will always be useful and which never will grow dim or doubtful.\" - Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,623

    Default

    the difference here is that you can simply lay the frame horizontal (with the bottom side already strung), place/trim the comb to fit the frame, and then string up the top.

    rubber bands certainly work, but this requires less fussing with the comb.

    deknow

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default

    rubber bands certainly work, but this requires less fussing with the comb.
    ditto
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Auburn and Tri-Cities Washington
    Posts
    334

    Default

    Just my two cents again but I found that string was a hassle when your gloves/hands are sticky with honey. They need to invent honey repellant for gloves. I mostly use mediums so it is easy to find rubber bands that fit around the frame with little hassle. I put two or three rubber bands on each frame bunched up at each end before I start the cutout. It is then easy to fit the comb and slide the rubber bands into place. I have also found that the rubber bands don’t stretch or get loose. This holds the comb in place better than string and I end up with less sagging comb. Again it’s just my preference and what I consider a much simpler way to do cut outs than building special frames with hinges, staples, wires, nails, strings, strings with rubber bands, etc.
    \"The man who sets out to carry a cat by its tail learns something that will always be useful and which never will grow dim or doubtful.\" - Mark Twain

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default

    but I found that string was a hassle when your gloves/hands are sticky with honey
    When I find my hands stick I find folding frames that I build the EZiest or a frame that I can lay the comb in
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    North Bend, OH, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default

    When I do cut-outs I use silicone gloves and have a 5 gallon bucket of water to drop tools in and wash hands. Its amazing how much more simple that makes things.

    I have also used catch frames like this. I been filming building them to do a second video. The first shows them in use and cutting the brood to match the frame:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAjtYKWXnOc
    Richard
    Carriage House Farm, North Bend, Ohio

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,373

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chief View Post
    but I found that string was a hassle when your gloves/hands are sticky with honey.
    So take off your gloves. d:-)


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads