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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Crescent City, FL USA
    Posts
    76

    Post non cut out bee removal?

    I was called out today for bees entering a house. When I got there they where entering the house threw a hole that the electric conduit goes into the house. Then the troubles showed themselfs, the outside is sided with asphalt shingles that if I tried to remove would just crack and break into pieces and they are so old that replacing is imposable. So I decided to look inside and guess what they just got done remodeling the whole inside, so inside cutting was also out.

    So I was left wondering how to get them out without cutting. btw she has to have them gone due to her daughter being deadly alergic. So I dont know if it would work but I had a thought about putting out a bate hive with drawn comb and lemon grass oil then injecting some almond oil into the wall ( I would use bee go but I am fresh out). This is the only thought I have had, if you have a better one please let me know. The next option was to let the pest control company that let me know about them go ahead and spay but if there was a way of saving them I am totally for it.

    And before it gets said I am aware of the idea of leaving the hive in the wall with all the honey and brood will attract more bees down the line. I told her about this but she beleves that she can plug up all the holes to keep them out and dont mind the smell of them in the house.

    Please let me know your thoughts.

    Richard
    6 Hives
    Crescent City, FL

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
    Posts
    5,125

    Default

    Trap out. I have never done it. But read about it. Search it. Here is a start.

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...highlight=trap
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    I would not even consider a trap out or any other method that would leave the comb intact. With the SHB (Small Hive Beetle) so active in Florida, you will end up with a stinking mess that seeps through the wall and attracts ants and other scavenger insects. It most likely will cause more damage than just opening up the wall and removing them. Ditto for a pesticide kill, eventually the mess will still appear after the pesticide residue subsides, the scavengers (ants and shb) will find a way in and things will quickly turn sour.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,845

    Default

    > dont mind the smell of them in the house.

    Oh yeah, the family will love that, nothing lovelier than the smell of rotting bees. As nice as a dead rat in the walls.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default

    Trap it out
    Rob it out
    Add wax moths
    Plug the hole
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Default

    I wouldn't touch that one with a ten-foot pole.

    The bees aren't worth it. It would take a lot of greenbacks to convince me to get involved, and even then, I would have serious reservations.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by honeyman46408 View Post
    Trap it out
    Rob it out
    Add wax moths
    Plug the hole
    In SHB territory, the chance is very high that the beetles will collapse the main hive before it can be robbed out. You will end up with a stinking, sour, rotting mess and a very angry home owner.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Greenhill, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    281

    Default

    what is the big deal with going in from the inside? If you can determine the location using heat or sound then you should be able to issolate the hive likely between two studs. Cutting out a strip of drywall is nothing to have put back in and painted..... then again i am a DIY guy and could do the repair myself for next to nothing other than my time.
    ________________
    Scott Stackhouse

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    I agree with afss - cut it out from the inside... easy to repair compared to outside siding. But if they just remodeled, that would mean that they would have come across the bees and combs, so perhaps they are traveling far into the house - perhaps an attic, or the bees have just moved in, and it is a smaller colony.

    MM

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Crescent City, FL USA
    Posts
    76

    Default

    I thought about the inside cut out but it is in the kitchen and they just redid the whole kitchen with that anoying plaster that is fanned out like a scalup shell and put in new cabinets across the whole wall.

    I started the trap out methiod and it seams to be going well so far. I will keep everyone updated.

    Richard
    6 Hives
    Crescent City, FL

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Greenhill, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    281

    Default

    if there are cabinets it may be that much easier. Today most cabinets are modular and depending on the location of the hive you may be able to drop an upper and cut a hole in the plaster behind it. when repairing its an easy fix as it will be covered by the upper.

    Having said that i am with Mapman, I have done a number of renos and if there was a large colony of bees living behind the walls while crashing and banging you would think that would have stired them up to the point that you could hear them.

    Do you know where the hive is located? is it behind the kitchen for sure or is that just the nearest point to the conduit? I am new to this but i know i have seen shows where a surface temp thermometer (i have heard them called laser thermometers but i don't think thats right) was used to locate the hive as the walls will be warmer than the surrounding area. you can get these thermometers fairly cheaply. I picked one up at a local store for 15 bucks on sale, its got more of a conical scan than a point but if you are close to what you are scanning its the same idea.
    ________________
    Scott Stackhouse

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