Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501

    Default What kind of tree is this?

    Can someone tell me what kind of tree this is? It's on the road to my new bee yard.

    http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m...IMGA0534-1.jpg
    Last edited by Parke County Queen; 04-27-2009 at 06:10 PM. Reason: Please reduce image size to 640x480
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Greenhill, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    281

    Default

    I can't say with out more information but i am guessing from the following site that it is a buckeye of some sort.

    http://www.treelink.org/whattree/

    Here is one of the best links i have found to start trying to id a tree. once it gives me a species i Google that species for images and see if they are similar. the difference would be that i don't know which buckeye it might be because of the last step so once you id it you can search more specific Google images than the ones below.

    http://buckeyegirl.com/sitebuilder/i...om-305x405.jpg
    http://a2.vox.com/6a00d4142a0c7c685e...146a3c7f-500pi
    http://images.google.ca/images?hl=en...-8&sa=N&tab=wi

    good luck
    ________________
    Scott Stackhouse

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mason County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    173

    Default

    Either a buckeye or chestnut and since the chestnut trees were killed off by disease, I am leaning towards it being a buckeye.

    I just planted some chestnuts saplings last year....no leaves on them yet, but they are budding out.

    Brenda

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    Sure looks like Buckeye to me too. What a coincidence! It was the plant, along with Chestnut, highlighted in the most recent; May 09 American Bee Journal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    329

    Default

    yeah, it doesn't look like a chestnut. I had one of those, but we had to cut it down to clear land for pasture. The horses didn't like it when they rollen on the spikey nut casings!

    justgojumpit

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Knoxville, TN, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default

    The leaves on a chestnut tree are serrated. There are plenty of chestnut trees around, just not American Chestnuts. The chines chestnuts have taken their place. Talk about a miserable messy tree too.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default

    Looks like a painted buckeye.




    American Chestnuts aren't gone, but severely lacking. They are still fighting the blight introduced from China. Some splicing has been done, but I don't know the results.

    I found a Chestnut on a saddle about half way to the top up in NC near Andrews once. The tree was about 30ft and bearing. I was kinda floored to find one that large since I have never saw one more than a couple or 3ft tall.

    That was back around "84". No telling if the tree has survived? It's pretty special that it had made it that far!

    Would be cool to go back up there to see if it could be found again. I remember the ridge line pretty well I think. Lotta open country in there though. Pretty hefty walk that I remember too.
    Last edited by Bizzybee; 04-26-2009 at 04:40 AM.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    morehead city, nc, usa
    Posts
    378

    Default

    I know of a large chestnut tree growing in a woods in northeast Ohio. Isolation saved it, I guess. That area was once covered in chestnut forest. Many houses from the early 1800s were built entirely of locally sawn chestnut.....framing, flooring, trim, doors, and furniture.


    I've heard of chestnut honey. Is there buckeye honey?
    "Lead, follow, or get out of they way". Thomas Paine

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501

    Default

    Is it a good nectar source??
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mason County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    173

    Default

    The chestnuts that I have are from stock that an old school teacher kept going. He taught grafting and used to make the students in his class graft trees and take them home to plant. I think he has been gone over 30 years now. There are no other chestnuts near where I planted them, so I am hoping they survive. They are not Chinese, as I would not want them in the first place. Hey, I walk around barefoot most of the time.

    I think that the buckeye is more of a pollen source than a nectar source. Correct me if I am wrong...and I know that someone will..

    Brenda

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Parke County Queen View Post
    Is it a good nectar source??
    According to the ABJ article, not much of a nectar source; some pollen. The Chestnut is a little better but it has some 'poisonous properties' caused by,..saponin from 'Aesculus californica' ??

    The Buckeye from ABJ: "Honey potential": As mentioned above, the American beekeeping literature has been surprisingly quite about A. glabra [Buckeye]. Pollen: In general, the species appears tp provide pollen to its visitors, but again the American beekeeping literature is quite quiet".

    I don't know what they mean by,..'quiet' but that's all I have time to type.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501

    Default

    I got my ABJ and read all about the buckeye. I don't know if any of you have heard about The Covered Bridge Festival in Parke County, but they sell everything there. Including Buckeyes and Hedge Apples. Maybe I should gather some and go into business! Regarding the Covered Bridge Festival, it is a fall festival that is attended by more than 2 million people. See link:

    http://www.southernin.com/Pages/arch...ed_bridge.html
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads