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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default Pumps for Sugar Syrup

    I would like to hopefully build a unit that I can quickly fill bottles of sugar syrup. Right now, I do it manually and it is tough on my back and time.

    I would like to have like a 30-50 gallon uniit in the bakc of my truck with a pump and a motor so I can use a hose to quickly fill the feeding bottles.

    I just do not know what type of pump to buy. Doesnt need to pump honey but just sugar syrup.

    Any affordable recomendations?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default I just do not know what type of pump to buy

    I used a pressure demand pump that I bought at a Ford RV agency.
    It did the job and it was low cost!

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    remember about how much you paid?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  4. #4

    Default

    Chef try Freshwatersystems.com they have pressure demand pumps. when you open the valve the pump comes on. You can get a 12 volt pump and hook it to your truck battery.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Norfolk, Nebraska
    Posts
    137

    Default

    12 volt, 10.5 gpm, hose, nozzle all for $129.99.


    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...5612_200365612

    I do not have any experience with this pump but have used fuel hose with nozzle for syrup off a centrifugal pump.

  6. #6

    Default

    The one from Northern does not work. syrup is to thick and would not prime. I also would like to know a low cost way I trasfer from the 2100 gal tote to the 275 gal tote on the back of the truck to pails to feed

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I have been using one from Harbor Freight Tools for about a year. It was around $30-$40. The pump housing is stainless, has worked well for pumping 1:1 into 1 gal feeders. It pumps from a IBC tote through a garden hose with a valve on the end. The pressure on demand would be nice, but I will deal with not having it and save a little money. I make sure I flush it out with clean water each time I use it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,252

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    Keith:

    Thanks for the suggestion.

    I need this unit to fit in the back of my truck. I have some yards that are tough to get to when it is wet out and would like to be able to put a hose on the syrup unit, turn the nozzle and fill the feeders where the hives are so I do not have to carry around the feeders.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    snip..
    The one from Northern does not work. syrup is to thick and would not prime.

    tecumseh:
    a lot of pumps are not self priming. the other consideration here would be... even if a pump is self priming the distance between the fluid level and the pump (often times referred to as 'the head') is absolutely important. given that the fluid to be pumped is thick (high viscosity) the engineered rating of the head of a particular pump would be more limited than if you were pumping water.

    there are some physical/engineering advantages to pushing fluids with air pressure (vs vacume) which I assume is what mr jarrett is doing.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    how do you get rigged up for this? And to make it work off a back of a small ford?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    Sorry to be asking all of these questions but I have no real clue what I am looking for or what I need to buy. I want to be able to move sugar syrup from a unit (be it a barrel or something) that is in my truck and be able to have it being pumped through a hose so I can fill feeders right at the hive. Just just do not know what I am looking for.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Using pump listed below, put a short garden hose on one end into barrel (Preferably off the bottom so you don't have to prime it). A second garden hose going out to fill feeders, I made a valve from pvc that threads on the end with a nozzle extending past it. Hook up with extensions to car battery or constant power on your taillight plug. I think you could make this setup for around $60-70?

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...temnumber=9576

    Air is a great idea, but I don't want to install a pump or tank in my pickup, and my truck dose not have air breaks to get air from. Maybe down the road?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default 120v,

    120V, 8.5 amps, 60 Hz, single phase, 3400 RPM
    Does it have a pressure relief valve.
    Please check out the pressure demand pump!
    it small , compact and inexpensive.
    How are you going to get 120 volts out in the woods?
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default gas pressure delivery system

    The farm service companies have been using carbon dioxide tanks with a regulator for many years to inject liquid fertilizer into the irrigation sytem.
    I made one up a pressure fed high fructose syrup system which is a lot more heavy than stimulative syrup.
    I only needed 5 to 7 psi to push the syrup out of a steel drum laid over on it's side.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    feeding simplified

    45 to 50 gallons of syrup X the weight of your syrup X the height of your tank = a cheap graivity fed system.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    I was thinking of a battery?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    what are pressure demand pumps?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    will any of the harbor freight units work with 2:1 syrup?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

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