Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,318

    Default First grafted queen cells of 2009 season

    This is a close-up of three of the nine ripe queen cells, from my first grafts of the season.

    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 04-06-2009 at 08:07 PM. Reason: reduce image size to 640x480 please
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Looking Good! They are well provisioned with royal jelly. They are well sculpted and thinned at the bottom.

    Regards
    BWrangler
    I once wrangled bees. But now, knowing better, I just let them bee.
    http://talkingstick.me/category/bees/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,318

    Default

    I got my bees to grow these in a different way than I have before.

    I've been building more nuc boxes, lots more nuc boxes. My plans are to build nuc colonies, raise queens, and sell or trade them. I run my nucs by starting them in a five-frame medium nuc box and stacking a second five-frame medium nuc box on top.

    I thought that if I used a similar plan for raising the small quantities of queen cells that I presently raise, it might be easier to work the two processes together. So, I began by taking two combs of honey/pollen and put them, one each, on the insides of the bottom nuc box, then inside those I put frames of emerging brood, then I left the center open to receive the cell bar. Next I placed an empty nuc box above and placed two more combs full of honey/pollen, one on each side of the top box, just inside the side-walls.

    I then placed a cover with one end moved back 1/4" for an entrance and proceeded to shake nurse bees onto the lid until both nuc boxes are jammed full of nurse bees. Next I graft the day old larvae into the cell cups, place it into the spot reserved for it in the bottom box, lay a pollen substitute pattie over the top bars in the bottom box and a quart syrup feeder adjacent to it, replace the top box and wait.

    I plan to use this set of bees for about three rounds of queen cells, then move them to the nuc yard, leaving them a queen cell (effectively turning them into a nuc). Then I would start a fresh queen cell building colony.

    Edited in later: I only graft eighteen or fewer cells, at one time, on a single bar. In the future I plan to build medium depth cell bar frames, so I can install a double-level of queen cells, and produce, perhaps as many as twenty-eight cells at a time.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 04-07-2009 at 10:34 AM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Reminder This is a close-up of three of the nine ripe queen cells,

    Super photo and queen cells.
    Good luck!
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads