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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    141

    Default Fermentation vessels

    About the only reasonably priced vessels over on this side of the Pacific are the carbouys used for home brewing beer.

    Has anyone experienced using them in mead making? I am interested especially in the possibility of odours or taints in flavour coming from them that may be detrimental to good mead making

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Algonquin, IL, USA
    Posts
    639

    Default

    In my opinion, if you're not going to use a stainless-steel fermenter, then a glass carboy is the way to go.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,027

    Default

    Carboys are pretty much the standard for any home fermentation. Definitely stick with glass if you can; it doesn't hold odors, is harder to scratch, cleans well, is impermeable to oxygen, and is easily sanitized. Cons are they're fragile (especially when full), difficult to get mashed fruit in and out of, and can be subject to cracking from thermal shock if you pour boiling must/wort/water/whatever into them. So don't do that .
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  4. #4

    Default

    Glass is all I use

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    141

    Default

    Sounds as though glass it is.

    I have found a place where I can get a 23 litre glass carbouy. Pricey but probably worth it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    UP michigan
    Posts
    214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SlickMick View Post
    Sounds as though glass it is.

    I have found a place where I can get a 23 litre glass carbouy. Pricey but probably worth it.
    Glass is great for mead, and there is a plastic carboy avilable here that I've used and made good mead with. This isn't the water carboys you'll buy with water in stores. It's made from a different formulation of plastic. Its light and won't break, not sure how long with will last and hold up compared to the glass, but so far it been ok.

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    19

    Default

    All I use is glass. Some 5 gallons and a 6 and a Half gal

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Hi Guys,

    I like the "Better Bottle". It's a 6 gallon plastic bottle designed especially for brewing. Resembles the water carboy bottles. But it's made out of a different plastic that's harder and less permeable to air and odors/flavors. I haven't detected any residuals from brewing in them.

    Much lighter and safer than glass.

    Regards
    BWrangler
    I once wrangled bees. But now, knowing better, I just let them bee.
    http://talkingstick.me/category/bees/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    141

    Default

    This is all very interesting. I can see that I'll have to do some more research over here to see what else I can get hold of.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Jefferson Co,WV, USA
    Posts
    88

    Default

    I've been making beer and mead on and off for 18 years I have always used plastic bucket fermenters they are less expensive, lighter and easier to clean the carboys the only thing better IMHO is SS conical fermenter but the expense has put me off
    I always pass on good advice. It is the only thing to do with it. It is never of any use to oneself. - Oscar Wilde

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    259

    Default

    I use a plastic bucket style for the primary fermentation. It has a lid with a hole dead center for catching all that lovely gas. I use a hose into a bottle of water in the beginning instead of a little air lock. This type of fermenter is great for adding fruit and taking it back out. When all the messy stuff is done - then I use a nice glass carboy. Nice and clean. Heavy as all heck but still the best for the job.

    happy brewing!

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