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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    We typically fill a dip tank with stain (darker type but doesn't matter) then after they dry we stack um and paint um. The paint goes on great after the staining and it also prevents rot on the tops and bottoms as the stain protects those areas. We have found no problems with the bees using this method as the inside gets stained also.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Troy, Illinois, Madison County
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Small, Jr View Post
    It's hard to tell due to how we treat the boxes. First we dilute an oil based primer 50-50 and dip the boxes. They drain on a rack and are then stacked head high using the tile spacers. A scrap box is used on the bottom so we don't have to spray too close to the ground. Then we spray a full strength coat of primer & two coats of paint.

    You can't see overspray because the inside of the boxes are already white, though you can still see the grain.

    Here's a photo:

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1608293741
    KRIKIE thats a lot of boxes litterally A "LOT"

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Cumberland, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Can you paint a couple hives while the bees are still in them? I only have 2 so can't really move the girls out while I do it.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Valley Center, CA
    Posts
    190

    Default

    I wouldn't. The paint fumes could be a problem. I would get an extra box and switch out the frames so you can paint unoccupied hives/supers.

    For my own bees, I let the boxes age for 2-3 weeks after painting to let the paint fully cure and the fumes dissipate.

    Maybe I'm being overly cautious, but I only have a handful of colonies now, I want to protect them.
    Last edited by Terry Small, Jr; 04-06-2009 at 09:04 PM. Reason: to add info

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    We painted around 3000 hives last fall with bees in them with no problems. Best to do it early in the morning while it is still cool and they are inside. If you need to scrap do it one day (cause it aggravates them) and then paint the next day.

    I haven't seen other then the odd bee getting stuck in the wet paint any ill effects at all painting a hive body with the bees in it.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,555

    Default

    We have painted boxes with the bees inside. Problem is, when they are on pallets you only get two sides.
    Sheri

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    Posts
    362

    Default

    I have learned from an old beek.
    I dip the boxes in salt water and if they are used I add a gallon of beach.
    I let them dry in the sun few days and then paint.
    I came across some free swiming pool paint that is superb in texture and color.
    Salted wood does not rot.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Box prep

    Wow, always something new to learn here. I have seen new boxes hosed down with water to raise the wood fibers before painting ( planer embeds them ) but never heard of salt treatment. Sounds great: Andrei, what is app concentration of salt? Also of bleach for old boxes and how long do you soak or?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    Posts
    362

    Default

    Salt is to the saturation point. We have a square tank and put 25lb of salt 2 yrs ago anf filled it with water.
    The medical book is saying that 10% clorine solution will kill EVERYTHING.
    I add a gallon everytime because clorine will evaporate in few days.
    I soal for 30 - 60 min but my buddy leaves them overnight.
    It is important to let them dry very good before painting.
    I dipp old frames to but I rinse the before I put the fundation on.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Millersville, Maryland
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AndreiRN View Post
    The medical book is saying that 10% clorine solution will kill EVERYTHING.
    I dipp old frames to but I rinse the before I put the fundation on.

    I wonder what effect this technique would have on equipment exposed to foul brood?

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Birch Run, Mi
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I stack them and use a roller. Oh, and hire a neighbor kid to actually do the work. Helps me, helps them. :-)

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    18

    Default Painting Hive bodies

    Argghh, you beat me to it. I too also hire some of the local kids to help when it is time to paint the bodies. Gives them some money and a sense of accomplishment. It also means that since they have worked on them, they are less likely to throw rocks etc at them later or otherwise bug the hives

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Dawson, PA USA
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Small, Jr View Post
    You can't see overspray because the inside of the boxes are already white, though you can still see the grain.

    Here's a photo:

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1608293741
    Is that a dead rabbit in the very bottom and center of pic??

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Valley Center, CA
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    I never noticed that. Our shop cat doesn't even have a name, we just call her 'cat'. The owner, Dave, did have some names for her when he witnessed her catch a pigeon in midair.

    Now that I think about it, since the only reason she exists, and why Dave buys her food, is to control the rodent population, why did he get so upset when she caught a pigeon midair?
    Last edited by Terry Small, Jr; 06-16-2009 at 04:52 PM.
    KI6FCI

  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord NH
    Posts
    2,665

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    I was wondering if there was a faster way to paint hive bodies. I know some use a spray gun and some stack up boxes and use a rolling pin to paint.

    Any other ways?

    I have 30 to paint tomorrow and would like to stack them up and paint them somewhat quicky (I have to work all weekend).

    Any ideas?

    Thank you!
    You can get one of the wagner power paint guns for ~60 bucks at Lowes.

    I hang a 2x4 about 3' off the ground and put it through my supers so they are effectively "hanging"

    I can get ~10 supers on a single 2x and put a single coat of primer on them in less than 5 mins.

    Let 'em sit in the sun for 1/2 hour and put first coat of exterior paint on.

    Give it an hour and put the second coat on and you're done.

    Time is money and I can get a lot more stuff done in the time I'm not farting around with a roller/brush

    If you're going to paint your house then spring for the $100 painter that has dual spray tips. They do a great job and save a lot of time/headache
    Milk Cows Not Taxpayers

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montesano, Washington
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    i don't paint my hives call me lazy but i use Copper Naphthenate and it perserves the wood from rot and wood eating insects. and if you get the brown not the green solution your hives take the cedar look to them. does no harm to the bees just make sure you let it cure 24 hours be for placing any bees in the hives.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake Park, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    155

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    How do you apply the copper stuff? At the time dad has us mixing it with laquer thinner and dipping them. I'm wondering if there is a better or another way I can try.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    I have a tub set up and filled with it. I take all of my unassembled parts and submerge them for 15 minutes or longer and allow them to soak up all they will take. Let dry for a few days before assembly. It doesn't take that long to dry but also doesn't hurt.

    The only active ingredient is copper. But the petroleum carrier oil needs to be well dried before allowing the bee's to come in contact with it. I typically don't have bees on the wood any earlier than a week after soaking and assembly. And I also leave everything outside after treating. Any rain will only serve to rinse the surface.

    There is also a water based version but it's harder to find and more costly if you have to consider shipping. It's called copper quinolate, I haven't personally used it and have no idea if it is as good?

    Side note: I also wipe clean, any residue that hasn't dried on the surface after a day. If you do plan to paint over the parts, it will not stick if any residue is left on the wood. Wiping and leaving for another day or so to dry will avoid that problem.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montesano, Washington
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    I buy it from home depot and its about 4 dollars cheaper then buying it from a bee supplier. I just take a throw away brush apply and let dry for 24 hours and then take out side and let air out a day or two and good to go no rot no wood destroying insects to worry about. and it give you that cedar look too unless you use the green stuff.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,710

    Default Re: Painting Hive Bodies

    What is the upside of soaking in that copper?


    Nevermind I read back... Slow today. I would be afraid though, the effect it would have on bees. I like natural inside the hive.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 06-20-2009 at 12:59 PM. Reason: unnecessary quote
    "Where wisdom is called for, force is of little use."
    Herodotus (circa 485-425 BC), Greek Historian

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