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  1. #1
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    Default Marketing: Creamed Honey VS Spun Honey VS Whipped Honey

    I have been selling creamed honey now for about 5 years or so. We called it creamed honey but I was doing a lot of driving this weekend and thought about some things.

    See, some people think creamed honey is made with cream. Of course, this is from people who need a little more educated but some people see the word creamed and think cream and then think negavitvely about it. So I thought about the other two markering terms for creamed honey which is spun hone yand whipped honey.

    To me, spun honey might be a better term for this. Spun honey has a nice sound to it.

    Whipped honey, to me, might not be precieved as a value item. A consumer might think that they can whip honey themselves and save a couple of bucks.

    I love marketing and I find it interesting to watch people.

    Any thoughts on this?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
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    Feb 2006
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    UP michigan
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    Default

    Were going to go with spun honey for the name, I think it will acomplish the goals your looking for at least in this neck of the woods. Hopeing to come up with a combination that will go with our wine and meads we sell.

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  3. #3
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    Jul 2006
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    Worcester County, Massachusetts
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    Default

    personally, i prefer "crystallized"....as this is what honey does of it's own accord. creamed, spun, (and "heated and filtered so it won't crystallize for that matter) all speak of "processing" that is done to the honey, whereas crystallized, to me, speaks of what liquid honey does on it's own...it's natural, stable state (as natural as liquid honey outside of the comb can be).

    deknow

  4. #4
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    Apr 2008
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    Dallas, TX
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    Default

    how about "crystal-smooth honey"?

  5. #5
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    Default

    Dek:

    Good point. I do not heat the honey to make the creamed honey. I do it a little different. I add the seed and mix it in. Bottle it and let it set.

    To me, I can control the hardness of the crystals. I would not call this processesing. Processesing means a lot of things. Heck, by taking out the frames and extrxacting, that can be called processesing.

    Just some thoughts.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  6. #6
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    May 2006
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    Washington Island, Wi
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    Default

    It kind of depends on which battle you are trying to fight as far as people's ignorance to what your product is and the process at which it is attained.

    I personally like chef's "spun" name - but deknow does have a good point. It matters what your costumers think as well as what information you can provide to put their concerns to rest.

    To some the word cream may be a + or a -. The word Cream is used in marketing differently now - in the old days of the dairy farms it spoke of high quality - the higher the cream the better the milk, ice cream - presently it sounds like something you're adding to not make it "natural"

    Here people equate crystallized honey with old, hard or difficult to work with. The idea that honey can be warmed to reliquify - that honey never goes "bad" - it doesn't really connect - let alone that it can be a great product in it's crystallized state - they think there is something inherently wrong with crystallized honey. Nevermind that the texture can by pleasing, that it makes a great spread on toast - part of the marketing involves educating no matter what you call it.

    Maybe some kind of survey from your costumers - both those that buy the "creamed" honey and those that shy away from it. Maybe include people that don't normally buy honey.
    Change is inevitable, Growth is optional

  7. #7
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    Jesse:


    Great insight on this! I just have noticed that I have to explain the word "creamed" more often than not. I haveto educate a lot of people on creamed honey as to what it is so it doesnt matter what I call it. They still ask what it is but the word "creamed" just catches some people. I get people who say "I do not want to try/buy that because it has cream in it". Than we explain.

    I do not like to use the word crystilized as I would have to agree with Jesse.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  8. #8
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    May 2006
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    Washington Island, Wi
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    Default

    It's like an ink blot test - 10 people can look at the same image and react 10 different ways - the idea is to find a term that has the most common positive reaction.

    you could have something like a customer survey -

    what do you think about when you hear the term "creamed honey" - "spun honey" - "whipped honey" etc.

    You could even do a poll on this website on what people prefer - the problem is that most everyone here knows what the product is - they are not a fair representative sample of your current and potential customer base

    What is the best term that describes the product and leaves a positive image?

    but as I wrote before - it ultimately is the education of the customer - they need to know what the product is and what it took to get it there - that is the most important thing - no matter what you call your product
    Change is inevitable, Growth is optional

  9. #9
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    I prefer 'spun' or maybe even 'spreadable' honey as a second choice. Creamed just has too much explanation-baggage associated with it to use.

  10. #10
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    Swo: How far are you from Farold?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  11. #11
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    If you aren't whipping it or spinning it, why would you want to lie to your customers? Call it what it is, Creamed Honey. Educate your customers. Treat them like they are smart enough to read and learn and they will sell your product for you.

    You could always call it Canadien Style Honey. Notice the spelling. W/ an "e" instead of an "a". That's how I saw Creamed Honey sold when I first found out about it.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  12. #12
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    we us a whip when adding the seed.

    Why call is Canadien?

    Canadians, as I understand it, make them creamed honey with a big mixer and mix until creamy and thick.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  13. #13
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    A bull whip? Or do you mean something like a whisp?

    Canadien STYLE, as a way to identify it.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  14. #14
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    in the culinary work, a whip is another name for a whisk.

    sorry
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    Swo: How far are you from Farold?
    I guess about 150 miles give or take. I was there last May to buy some Nucs and forgot the distance. He, Bill & I need to meet up sometime and have a glass (or ten) of mead and talk bees sometime.

  16. #16
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    I will be headed there for a few days in the summer time during my break to learn how to do cut outs.We all should get together.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    I will be headed there for a few days in the summer time during my break to learn how to do cut outs.We all should get together.
    Where is 'there'? Farold's place? Keep me posted on date/time and maybe I can horn my way in on this training. If Hoover's there, it should be a good time. I'm located literally in the center of our state and he's in the far southern edge, but relatively central. I checked Mapquest and it's about 220 miles from my home to his - from my brother's place, it's just at 160 & that's where my journey started last spring. Probably how I thought it was about 150 miles.

  18. #18
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    Schenectady, NY, USA
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    Default Spun Honey

    Be careful here. I understand that Spun Honey is a trademark owned by Sue Bee and they are not shy about enforcing their rights.
    Lloyd Spear, Owner of Ross Rounds, Inc. Manufacturers of round section comb equipment and Sundance Pollen Traps.

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=sqkcrk;410369]If you aren't whipping it or spinning it, why would you want to lie to your customers? Call it what it is, Creamed Honey. Educate your customers. Treat them like they are smart enough to read and learn and they will sell your product for you.QUOTE]

    I had to think about this one a bit. It is indeed 'whipped', using a drill and a beater of sorts or similar powered device. In theory, it's spun, as the whip, whisk, beater, etc. is turned a number of revolutions. It sure as heck is not 'Creamed' in any way whatsoever. No cream is added, it's consistency isn't really that of cream, either, I can't begin to see why we should call it 'creamed'. So, I'd stick to calling it what it is - spun, whipped or anything else meaning blended with a drill, whisk, blender or other device but 'creamed'. Now, as was mentioned, we need to be careful with trademarks of any kind, so what is in a name... sometimes a lawsuit apparently!

  20. #20
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    It has been "Creamed", a technical term for finely crystallized honey. Check out Roger Morses' Dictionary of Beekeeping. Especially the work done by Dr. Dyce, whose name was given to the bee lab at Cornell University for his work w/ honey.

    Also, if it isn't very creamy in consistency, maybe the process of producing it should be refined by the producer.

    Stollers' Creamed Honey from Latty, Ohio is or was the best Creamed Honey I ever ate. The Stollers were also the families that developed the frame spacers. Properly called the Stoller Frame Spacers.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



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