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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hughson, CA
    Posts
    153

    Default Carbolineum Wood Treatment

    I recently received and advertisement in the mail for Carbolineum wood preservative. This ad recommended it on bee equipment. I have never heard of it before. Has anyone tried it? I was thinking of using it on lids. Ay thoughts would be appreciated.

    Their website: www.carbolineum.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Default Carbolineum

    Hi, this material was used for many years for all kinds of wood treatments such as fence posts, railroad ties and power poles. I don't think that you have seen much of this much less smelled it. I don't think that is is allowed anymore for these items and I definitely would not use it anywhere around bees or the garden. If you ever got this stuff on your bare skin you would know it for days by its burning sensation. Take care and have fun

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,671

    Default

    If my memory is correct, this product is used on hive stands only.

    Roland

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Effect of Wood Preservative Treatment of Beehives on Honey Bees and Hive

    Effect of Wood Preservative Treatment of Beehives on Honey Bees and Hive
    Products.
    Here is some very good data:
    http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf1984/kalni84a.pdf
    Effects of wood preservatives on the microenvironment in treated beehives were assessed by measuring
    performance of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies and levels of preservative residues in bees, honey,
    and beeswax. Five hives were used for each preservative treatment: copper naphthenate, copper
    8-quinolinolate, pentachlorophenol (PCP), chromated copper arsenate (CCA), acid copper chromate
    (ACC), tributyltin oxide (TBTO), Forest Products Laboratory water repellent, and no treatment (control).
    Honey, beeswax, and honey bees were sampled periodically during two successive summers. Elevated
    levels of PCP and tin were found in bees and beeswax from hives treated with those preservatives. A
    detectable rise in copper content of honey was found in samples from hives treated with copper naphthenate.
    CCA treatment resulted in an increased arsenic content of bees from those hives. CCA,
    TBTO, and PCP treatments of beehives were associated with winter losses of colonies.

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Your answer in a nut shell:

    Your answer in a nutshell:
    beehives with (1) a preservative-free water-repellent
    solution, (2) copper naphthenate, (3) copper 8-
    quinolinolate, and (4) ACC. Winter survival with these
    treatments was better than or comparable to that in controls.
    Of these four treatments, only copper naphthenate
    gave a slight increase in copper content of honey (less than
    1 ppm).
    We suggest that beekeepers not use PCP, TBTO, or
    CCA for treatment of beehives. The CCA treatment, being
    nonvolatile and largely insoluble (fixed in wood), could be
    used only on hive parts that rarely come in contact with
    bees.
    Protection of wooden beehive parts without detrimental
    effects on bees, honey, and wax should result from treatment
    with copper naphthenate, ACC, and copper 8-
    quinolinolate.
    Early indications are that the preservative-free, waterrepellent
    treatments do not provide long-term protection
    against decay in all hive parts. Additional observations
    are needed to fully define the utility and limits of waterrepellent
    treatments for beehives in this climate, but early
    results indicate that treatment of hive parts with an acceptable
    preservative is warranted.
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Sounds like everyone has gone green.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Hey Matt,
    Doesnt sound any different than kreyesote.As far as letting the material air out for 6 months to a year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Green

    Just don't BBQ or campfire with that green colored wood!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Carbolineum

    Dark, smelly, sticky, slow to dry ( never ), stains everything costs a fortune to ship.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
    Posts
    401

    Default

    make sure its a burn day.Lol.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Copper naphthenate in short supply.

    I can buy quarts of Copper Napthenate at a local The Home Depot.
    They have a back order for the one gallon size.
    I was told by a local hardware store that it unavailable because of a new California law.

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Wood preservative

    I have been treating my pallets for 15 yrs with copper based stuff. It makes a huge difference in longevity.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default I have been treating my pallets for 15 yrs

    Do you paint over the copper "stuff" ?
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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