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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
    Posts
    312

    Default Chalk Brood, how to treat?

    I have one group of hives that have some serious chalk brood and I need to treat.

    I have heard rumors that powder Cinnomon on top of brood can help, but have no idea how much to use per hive.
    Also, bleach in syrup can help, I understand, not sure on mix.

    Looking for input and methods

    Thanks, Larry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I use two methods:

    1. Re-queen (if I can). Most of my chalk brood is a result of bad genetics.
    2. Bleach, I've added 1 gallon of bleach to 2500 gallons of syrup. (I dont' know what that ratio would be)
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Valley Springs, Ca.
    Posts
    135

    Question Chalk brood?

    Are these Aussie bees?
    Jack

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,162

    Default

    I have seen a ratio of 500 to 1; syrup to bleach, used in feed as a general sanitizer. I also know someone who has successfully used 50:50 bleach to water as a spray to clean up active cases. He reported that the day after spray the hives had done major house cleaning with piles of old pupal casings and debris piled up outside the front door. I thought that concentration would kill the bees, but he said they just thoroughly cleaned house and fully recovered from the chalk. I haven't tried it myself, but I have seen that bees can be fairly tolerant of chlorine. Temperature at application may be important in terms of how fast the chlorine volatilizes and how fast the bees dry out. I think he used a light mist and spritzed it on.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default CB

    Bleach in syrup roughly same % as Dennie explained has been touted around here for long time. Never bothered myself though just some requeen and build up then it's gone.
    Last edited by Tom G. Laury; 03-07-2009 at 08:33 PM. Reason: credit

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    LA Co, Calif, USA
    Posts
    86

    Default cinnamon

    I read that Randy Oliver uses lots of cinnamon in his pollen sub. Maybe helps with chalk brood?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Default

    It will go away on it's own, but I would requeen to avoid it happening again.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beespests.htm#chalkbrood
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Flathead Co, MT ,USA
    Posts
    15

    Default chalk

    Last summer of course all my aus. queens had bad chalk and once the bees quit carrying out mummies I thought they had worked through it. Well they had cause the didnt have any brood left to make mummies out of. Dryier weather and good nutrition and a nice new queen cure chalk brood.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default new queen

    Hey Larry;
    The conseses is a new queen.
    I am still booking M H queens 50% down to book and the ballance in full 14 days before delivery!
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    LA Co, Calif, USA
    Posts
    86

    Default cinnamon oil

    Found this study that involved cinnamon oil - sounds like it was effective?. Last year after a Fumigillin-B treatment we had some chalkbrood; cleared up; no further problems, but we did requeen alot.

    http://www.hgsc.bcm.tmc.edu/projects...iew_Chalkb.pdf

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Default

    Thinking that it probably could be related to genetics, but, then, what bee isnt susceptible to chalk brood when put under stressful conditions.

    You mention one group of hives within your operation. I am also assuming your queen program includes all your hives. Not all your hives have a serious enough of a problem to comment on, so I would guess its probably something environmental.
    That is, for some reason that particular yard has come down with the disease. Extra stress perhaps? In a windy spot? Bad water? Shortness of nectar? Poor pollen source?
    Agriculture? Who knows.

    What I think your asking is there a way of relieving the problem withing your yard.
    My best guess would be to provide them with a protein supplement. Maybe set out some water for them,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Chalkbrood

    Some more data from the web:
    http://maarec.psu.edu/pest&disease/slide25.htm

    Chalkbrood Time of Treatment Treatment Material Method of Treatment

    Spring and Summer New queens
    There is no registered chemical treatment for Chalkbrood.

    Maintain strong colonies and requeen with queens from Hygienic stocks.

    Ernie
    Last edited by BEES4U; 03-20-2009 at 07:00 PM. Reason: Added the URL
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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