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Thread: Wax moth

  1. #1
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    Default Wax moth

    Today as I was watching my hive I noticed a small moth lurking on the side of the hive. I captured it, ID'ed it and sure enough it was a greater wax moth.

    I was a bit alarmed but I guess the good news is it was on the OUTSIDE of the hive not the INSIDE.

    From what I've heard if your hive has any bees at all on each frame the wax moths won't bother them. Is that correct?

  2. #2
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    So long as the population in the hive is strong enough to police the frames, then the moth won't be a bother. The trouble comes when the bees population is not strong enough to police all the frames in the hive.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  3. #3
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    Default it was on the OUTSIDE of the hive not the INSIDE.

    The moth does not have to be inside the hive to lay eggs. It can lay eggs outside the hive and the larvae crawl inside.
    One moth may lay up to 300 eggs.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  4. #4
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    Default

    Ray, how many bees constitute a "police force".?

    Ernie, are the outside larvae able to crawl into the hive and climb vertically from there into the combs?

  5. #5
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    franklinton,la.
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    Default

    My question is what can one do to prevent wax moth? I have several new hives just started this year . That makes them vunerable due to being small in strengh.

  6. #6
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    Swabby, there is some sort of bacterial spray called bt powder which will attack the wax moth larvae leaving the bee larvae unharmed. I think someone named Sundance sells it here at a good price; Do a search here for bt powder.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Thanks for the advice Dr.Wax however I am doing my best to stay chemical free as long as I can.

    I lost a hive last September and found wax moth had taken over due to a smaller colony of bee. I never find an answer as to why the colony grew weak . It had been my strngest hive in the spring .

  8. #8
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    The only defense you have against them in active hives
    is strength, period.

    In storage, light is your friend. Freezing works for killing
    any infestation that exists.

    Bt is as soft as you can go. Rated for organic use.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Thanks for the advice Dr.Wax however I am doing my best to stay chemical free as long as I can.
    As Sundance mentioned this is not a chemical treatment. It uses bacteria which do not harm the bees but wipe out the wax moth larvae. Would be great for storage as well as routine use on combs in the hive.

    If Ray and Ernie are unavailable I hope someone else can answer my questions.
    Last edited by Dr.Wax; 03-19-2009 at 10:44 PM. Reason: beecause

  10. #10
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    Default

    So an interloper to my own thread gets his questions answered but not me?

    *Stomps off to beemaster forums*

  11. #11
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    Default dave cushmans wax moth trap

    http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cus...xmothtrap.html

    never tried it, let us know if it works.

    mike

  12. #12
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    Default are the outside larvae able to crawl into the hive and

    Yes, and they do a good job of moving into the hive.
    The larvae are about one mm in length.
    Try using B t var a it works!
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  13. #13
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    Default

    Ernie, I do plan to get some of that powder later this year. I hear that once its sprayed it protects indefinately.

  14. #14
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    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
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    Default

    It doesn't work indefinitely. I once used it to get rid of an infestation of Greater Wax Moth, which I don't normally encounter this far north. I've never seen them since, but it wasn't that long before Lesser Wax Moth moved back in.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

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