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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brevard county Fla
    Posts
    46

    Default requeen then check for cells ?

    I am planning on requeening 5 aggressive hives in a couple of weeks. I intend them to be queenless for 24 hours then use push in cages for introduction. I will look for queen cells while I am looking to pinch the existing queens. I have read that after requeening (agressive ?) hives that you still need to check for queen cells very 2 weeks for possibly 3 (2 week) cycles. Is this correct for normal practice or just a theoretical exercise ?
    Thanks
    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Default

    If your destroy all the queen cells when you get rid of the old queen, and they except the new queen. They would only construct queen cells for the purpose of supersedure or swarming.

    I am always careful about destroying queen cells in a hive until I figure out why there building them. If for the case of supersedure let them keep the new queen the bees know when they need to replace mom. And if you destroy the cells you may cause problems down the road when the queen actually fails and colony recovery takes longer.
    If they are building swarm cells perform some other kind of swarm control I have found that destroying swarm cells only delays the event. Also if you destroy swarm cells after they have already swarmed you run the risk of making the colony queenless. I watched a hive swarm and performed an inspection the next day and was amazed at how strong the colony still was. None of the swarm cells were hatched out, so I pinched off all but two cells to prevent an after swarm.
    Last edited by Brent Bean; 03-15-2009 at 09:47 PM.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default aggressive hives

    You may want to divide those agressive hives for better queen acceptance.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    my advice would be exactly what ernie has suggested.

    are you certain the hives are not currently queenless? have you had these 5 hives tested for afrianization (which I am told makes requeening difficult and again reinforces what ernie has suggested in the previous post).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,587

    Default

    Or leave them queenless for a period of time until they construct their emergency cells, have no young enough larvae to build new ones, and then use your push in cages. That way, you'll find any that have multiple queens...you'll find eggs in dequeened colony.
    Last edited by Michael Palmer; 03-16-2009 at 06:31 AM. Reason: forgot to say...

  6. #6

    Default

    Where are you getting your queens this early?
    Try to learn something new every day and give thanks for all your blessings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brevard county Fla
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Thanks for the replies.
    I do not wish to split and gain more hives.
    A friend is buying queens (not sure where ga ?) and I am piggybacking on his order.

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