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Thread: I'm lost

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    columbus,ohio,USA
    Posts
    518

    Default I'm lost

    Ok...I am little confused with about everything. First what is a nuc? How do you prevent swarming? I hope to beek in my backyard in what could be called suburbia. How do you figure out where a swarm is? How much would you say full start up cost is? What is a ideal place for bees? ex. sunny /shaddy How fast does the population grow? a hive a year hive a month?How do seperate honey come and honey without a serperater? Are raccons I issue?How often do you check your hives? If it is not too bad I could find someone out in the country who would let me put bees there. And any other usful info. I am on the aiting list for books at the library but am very eger to learn.

  2. #2

    Default

    The first thing you need to do is join a CLUB. You will learn a lot from other bee keeps. A Nuc is a small bee box for ether 3 or 5 frames. where a normal box is 10 or 8. Depending on your set up. You would be better of with a package of bee. You will need to feed them. SPEND a day and do a lot of reading here or http://forum.beemaster.com/r . Then hit the search buttons
    My-smokepole
    http://www.davidspaintingandwallpapering.com"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ravenna, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    305

    Default

    I recommend you get to this class on Tuesday, if possible.

    http://www.centralohiobeekeepers.com/index.htm

    Central Ohio's BEGINNER’S BEEKEEPING SCHOOL will be held in March of 2009. Cost is $50; add $10 for each additional family member. The fee covers all classes, handouts and instructional material, and a one year's membership in C.O.B.A. The first four classes are on Tuesday evenings, beginning at 6:30 p.m. and run until 9:00. The final class is a Saturday morning "hands on" session. Class topics include the basics of beekeeping as well as bee biology, products of the hive, and honeybee diseases & laws.

    MEETING PLACE
    Franklin Park Conservatory
    1777 East Broad Street
    Columbus, OH 43203
    Blue Sky Bee Supply
    Quality Bee Supplies, Bees and Containers!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    Try to find a beekeeper in your area and help him this year and learn and get ready to start your own colonies next spring. Expect to spend $500-$1000 to get started. Remember with luck you will get your investment back 24 months.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Default

    A good book to get for beginning beekeepers is “ Beekeeping for Dummies” Don’t be insulted about the title, is a good cook book instructional for a year in beekeeping. You should find all your answers there.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,960

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    Ok...I am little confused with about everything. First what is a nuc?
    A nuc is just a little hive that holds 3-5 frames.
    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    How do you prevent swarming?
    I stop swarming by doing it for them. When they start getting too big for their hive, I take the queen and some frames of bees and put them in a nuc box. They just swarmed but I don't have to chase them.

    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    I hope to beek in my backyard in what could be called suburbia. How do you figure out where a swarm is? How much would you say full start up cost is? What is a ideal place for bees? ex. sunny /shaddy
    Use Craigslist to maybe get some used stuff cheap. If you get two hives and all of the stuff, the comment above is probably correct. You can do it cheaper with used stuff in the beginning. A bee club might have equipment to loan you to start.

    A sunny spot is best, but bees have lived in the wild in the shade for a long time and they can do it now. You might find a swarm on Craigslist also, but the fire department gets call all of the time about swarms.

    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    How fast does the population grow? a hive a year hive a month?
    If you start from a nuc, package or swarm they will probably have two deep boxes filled with comb and bees by the end of the summer. Maybe more, it depends on your location.

    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    How do seperate honey come and honey without a serperater?
    You can cut the comb (or scrape if you use plastic foundation) and crush it up and strain it into a bucket.

    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    Are raccons I issue?
    They never have been for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by giant pumpkin peep View Post
    How often do you check your hives?
    In the beginning it is good to check a little weekly to see and learn. You can see the changes and see what is going on. Now I usually just look at the entrance and maybe take to top off. If something doesn't look right, I might pull some frames. As a beginner, you should learn all you can even it it might set them back a little each time you look.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    columbus,ohio,USA
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Thanks ,keep them coming, unfortunatly can't make it too the class because I don't have the money..lol...Any way that is my plan is the learn from another beekeeper I know. Also , how many acres per hive in a neighborhood setting? Everyone has flower ins ome way shape, or form.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    berkley county, WV
    Posts
    429

    Default

    a colony of bees will forage over approx. a 3 mile(yes I said mile) circle. a mile and a half in any direction from their hive.
    welcome to your new addiction!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Most of your questions have been answered so I'll just add my two cents on a couple of them.

    You can extract honey via "crush & strain" as was mentioned, but my method is "borrow an extractor". Perhaps your beekeeping friend can help connect you with someone who has an extractor they'll let you use. Also, bee clubs often have extractors for members to use.

    As for beekeeping in surburbia, unless there are specific legal restrictions against it, that shouldn't be a problem. I know beeks who have had as many as 15 hives in a typical subdivision lot.

  10. #10

    Default

    You might try looking at the classified ads in your local agricultural review if you have one for used equipment or people selling hives. Also, your local club may have a webpage where they list items for sale.

    Also, for learning order one of the free catalogs from beekeeping suppliers, they're fun to look through and show what a lot of equipment is and how it is used. Dadant's phone is toll-free 1-888-922-1293, Betterbee's is 1-800-632-3379.

    Your local library may have books on beekeeping too.
    Try to learn something new every day and give thanks for all your blessings.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    248

    Default

    The earlier reply about a 3 mile foraging radius does not mean that you can only have one hive every 3 miles. It just means that bees will travel up to that far for a good nectar source if there are none closer. You can put a hive in a suburban backyard (you could put several actually) and they will find plenty of pollen and nectar sources. And your neighbors will probably never notice an increase of bees around their homes or picinic tables. But I still recommend telling them about your plans after you checking your local ordinances and protective covenants. It's a sure thing that someone will see your hive or see you all suited up and freak out due to their own mis-conceptions about bees. If someone nearby is severely allergic you will want them to know where your hive is and to steer clear.

    You seem very eager. Don't let yourself get overwhelmed. Find a mentor, a couple of good books, and search this forum for the wealth of information that has been discussed and the questions that are already answered.

    Above all, enjoy this fascinating and rewarding hobby!
    Carl

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    columbus,ohio,USA
    Posts
    518

    Default

    [QUOTE][Your local library may have books on beekeeping too. /QUOTE]

    I got a few books on reserve but I am 4th and 9th on the list for a couple different books. Beekeeping for dummies and backyard beekeeping I think it is called. Gonna go to their website now and reserve more.=)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Hey Pumpkin, berkie here. A good source of used books is abebooks.com. You should go to that first meeting that Bluesky mentioned. Seeing is how you are only 13 and very enthusiastic, they might offer a "scholarship" or some kind of discount. It would definitely be that best way to meet some beekeepers and learn a lot in a short period of time. Also, you should be able to find ways to earn a little money. We used to run errands, shovel snow and even wash garbage cans to save money for things. Also, consider either writing a letter to your local newspaper, or have someone interview about your quest to become a beekeeper. Maybe you could do a mini bottle drive, either going door to door, having your parents bring you around to collect, or spending a saturday at the redemption center getting donations. Where there's a will, there's a way, and you sure seem to have the will. Be Creative!!!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    columbus,ohio,USA
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Hi berk...at any other time I would probly be able to afford it. Right now I take care of neighbors dogs for money but I have to pay for my school trip to washington DC

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    burnet texas
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Beeking for Dummies was a big help for me.
    A big dog weighs a hundred.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,081

    Default Keep looking here in BeeSource

    There is a section called 'Getting Started' next to this part of the forum. Take a cruise through it and you will find some great advice. Caution, you can ask 10 beekeepers the same question and don't be surprized if you get 11 different answers, all being right to varying degrees. We've all learned from someone else, books, BeeSource, attending meetings, etc. and have formed our own opinions and attitudes.

    For example, when it comes to buying expansions, my brother likes packages & I can't understand why anyone wouldn't just buy nuc's instead. Queens and splits are a great manner to expand and we both do that. He has his rationale, I have mine & we're both right! Now, I'm learning to raise queens and plan to make my own expansions that way. But I need to buy some queens we need some different breeding stock to mix up the gene pool.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dolgeville, NY
    Posts
    53

    Default getting the honey out

    i have a larger beekeeper spin mine for me he only charges .10 cents a pound not bad if you ask me with all the mess. I then take it home and strain it .Look around.Good luck!! and have fun!!!
    Greg wilson

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,554

    Default

    >First what is a nuc?
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnucs.htm

    >How do you prevent swarming?
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesswarmcontrol.htm

    >How do you figure out where a swarm is?

    People call you.

    >How much would you say full start up cost is?

    Five hundred dollars should give you a fair start. But if you find some old beekeeper who will give you some old equipment...

    >What is a ideal place for bees?

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfaqs.htm#locating

    >How fast does the population grow? a hive a year hive a month?

    A typical hive will be big enough to swarm the second year if you don't head it off.

    >How do seperate honey come and honey without a serperater?

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm#crushandstrain

    >Are raccons I issue?

    Not usually, but sometimes.

    >How often do you check your hives?

    Anywhere from twice a year to twice a month.

    > If it is not too bad I could find someone out in the country who would let me put bees there.

    Put the word out and sooner or later someone will offer. Contact your local bee club and they may already know someone.

    www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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