Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,433

    Default Nosema (Again, Sorry)

    The crazy thing is that I just attended a bee meeting that had an hour long presentation on Nosema, and I'm still asking.

    I have a hive that has been strong, by all appearances. Today, I looked at that hive and there were three or four dots of dark bee poop on the back of the hive and two bees that had crawled up on my house and died.

    So, I opened up that hive and its just booming. I had two mediums boxes and then I checkerboard two more on top. I saw no bee poop inside the hive. The bottom three mediums are full of bees and brood. The brood area has expanded into the third box. They're storing nectar and pollen in the top medium. In other words, other than the funny looking bee poop, this hive looks great to me. Also, since they are already putting nectar in one of the boxes I will harvest from, I don't really like the idea of treating for Nosema.

    So, taking all of this into account, should I not worry about Nosema right now on this hive?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default

    Sounds to me like you don't need to worry about Nosema at the moment with that hive.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    snip...
    So, taking all of this into account, should I not worry about Nosema right now on this hive?

    tecumseh:
    I will somewhat disagree with ray on this question.

    You should be aware that unlike our yankee beekeeping brothers and sisters (where their bees are shut in by cold weather for months on end) that at your location that you are quite unlikely to notice any scat signs that might indicate nosema.

    you can pull the bees apart at the abdomen and look at the condition of the hind gut if you wish to employ a field test for nosema. a sample looked at under a microscope is quite obviously a better test. within almost ALL southern apiarys I suspect that nosema is much more a silent killer.... that is since the signs of nosema are subtle most folks never know to look there.

    with a booming hive I would have little concern. the kinds of indicators I notice on hives that I suspect (not tested, but I have acquired a microscope to develop this skill in the near future) have nosema problems are... 1) a hive who's population never seems to exand even while being fed 2) if you are feeding with frame feeder (I would suspect the same from hive top feeders) a constantly accumulating number of dead bees that are never removed from the feeder (and the feeder is never really emptied entirely). in the old days we would have called these poor doers. casually as I have empolyed the use of fumidil a bit more and these 'poor doers' respond positively to this treatment. no ABSOLUTE proof in this treatment... but the positive effect of treatment does suggest what the problem is likely to include.

    articles in old bee magazine also suggest the level of infestation of nosema is much more acute that most folks are aware. at one time a good deal of blind experiement were done on packages from southern bee keeping operation. the level of nosema infestation was extreme in some samples.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,889

    Default

    Dysentery after a confinement is normal. It does not mean they have Nosema.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Default

    We've just had an unusually hard winter in the UK (can't speak for elsewhere) and it's been noticeable that there's been more apparent dysentery about. My hive entrances were streaked with poo, and on a couple of occasions I watched bees coming out on mild days and immediately going. It's nothing more than the fact that they were confined in the hive till they were desperate.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads