Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Washington Island, Wi
    Posts
    350

    Question Push in cage: pros and cons

    I've read numerous times in threads that people recommend a push in cage for queen introduction. I was wondering - those of you that have experience with them, could you please elaborate on the pros and cons of the push in cage?

    Also, where did you get your push in cages? did anyone make their own? If so, please explain how.

    I haven't handled a queen bare-handed and I am a little hesitant to have to do so - for fear of harming her. Some have suggested to practice on drones - I will definately do that as I want to raise and mark queens on my own at some point. But until then, what is your routine when you let the queen go and slap the cage over her?

    Thank you for your time

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bowling Green, Kentucky
    Posts
    419

    Default

    my first time trying to put a queen in a push in cage she flew off and I remembered what the gentleman who sold her to me said he said if she flys off just sit down and be real still wait about 1 hour and more often than not she will come back as that is the only area she knows and that is where her attendants are. in about 15 minutes she came back and landed right there on the comb and I put the push in cage over her and went on about my day, I will say that the whole time I was sitting there I was thinking to myself why did I try this now I have lost the queen and will never get her back but she did come back. the only other con that I know of is if you have small hive beetle in your area the cage leaves an area that the bees can not remove shb brood from and you have your queen trapped in there.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    Brushy makes one

    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com...sp?number=260P

    I have made my own from hardware cloth. I had a roll of cloth for making packages that i used. I just cut 6" squares and bent about 1/2" on every side. The beetles are an issue but if you get back to release her in a few days it will be ok. I use a sprayer and douse the queen so she won't fly off.
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Default

    >could you please elaborate on the pros and cons of the push in cage?

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesdoolitt...#ValuableQueen
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfaqs.htm#pushincage

    The only cons are you have to make one (to get a good one, I hate the plastic ones) and you have to use it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Trumbull, CT
    Posts
    406

    Default

    I use them. I never had a queen get rejected but I have had a couple fly off trying to get them in. I transfer them inside my screened in porch now.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,741

    Default

    They sell a queen muff somewhere that allows you to manipulate a queen without as much danger of her flying away. I think that practice makes perfect and after a while, you probably won't need it.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bowling Green, Kentucky
    Posts
    419

    Default

    brushy mountain has the bee muff

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    The pro is a 98% acceptance rate- the highest of any queen introduction method.

    The con is none.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    The only thing I don't like is that I have to revisit the hive. Some of our out yards are 5 hours, or even other states away. I'm still working on soldering a small tube to my home made ones that I can fill with candy so the bees and chew her out.
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Limestone, Alabama
    Posts
    577

    Default

    I always get good acceptance rates with the push-in cage unless, and this has happened a few times, the bees chew away enough comb around one edge of the cage to release the queen too early.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default

    I use push in cages. They are easily made out of 1/8 inch hardware cloth. I rarely loose a queen.

    I also use the queen catcher
    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com...asp?number=341
    queen muff
    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com...sp?number=264M
    and queen marking tube
    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com...asp?number=264

    in catching, manipulating and marking queens.

    They work very well together and there is very little chance of damaging or losing a queen.

    By the way late winter (on a warm day) is a very good time to mark queens. There are fewer bees, making it much easier to find a queen.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his contribution. Charles Koch

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slickbrightspear View Post
    my first time trying to put a queen in a push in cage she flew off and I remembered what the gentleman who sold her to me said he said if she flys off just sit down and be real still wait about 1 hour and more often than not she will come back
    I once had a Russian queen to fly off and it began raining in about a minute after she flew. I was sure I had lost her. So, I just put the hive back together and checked it in about a week and she was in the hive laying eggs. I know it was her since she was marked.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his contribution. Charles Koch

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Washington Island, Wi
    Posts
    350

    I wish that happened to me!

    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxy View Post
    I once had a Russian queen to fly off and it began raining in about a minute after she flew. I was sure I had lost her. So, I just put the hive back together and checked it in about a week and she was in the hive laying eggs. I know it was her since she was marked.

    I installed a package a few years ago with a Mn Hy queen. I had to keep them in the cage for two days as it poured down rain, so I figured with the extra time - I would just directly release the queen. It was one of those plastic JB cages, I opened the end and held the cage just over the top of the brood chamber - she proceeded to crawl out the end, up the cage - after about two steps she flew off!

    I put the queen cage by the entrance and closed the hive - she never came back, I had trouble with that colony all year. I gave them a frame of brood - they raised their own queen, but it was too early for her to mate well - she was superceded after a couple of months. I ended up combining in the fall and feeding.

    I should have combined them with another colony after a day and split them when I could get a mated queen.

    Another lesson learned.

    Thanks for your input so far, I am going to give them a try this year. In the past I take a couple of frames of brood and nurse bees and introduce the new queen in a nuc. After a couple days I combine the nuc back with the colony (after the old queen has been "removed"). I've had very good success using this method - it's just a little labor intensive now that the yard has grown into double digits.

    Micheal Bush, why don't you like the plastic push in cages?

    Thanks again for your replies.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    avery county n.c.
    Posts
    240

    Default

    I bought some plastic push in cages from Brushy that I have not used. They have (I think) 4 legs that stick into the comb. Looks like it would be easy to chew in under the edge that is just sitting on the comb....
    Thanks for your time, Beehopper

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Default

    >Micheal Bush, why don't you like the plastic push in cages?

    >I bought some plastic push in cages from Brushy that I have not used. They have (I think) 4 legs that stick into the comb. Looks like it would be easy to chew in under the edge that is just sitting on the comb....

    That's way. The four plastic legs don't create a wall that they have to get around. A well made one out of 1/8" hardware cloth has a row of spikes that stick 1/4" down into the comb or more. This keeps the queen from getting out (or them from getting in) for at least a couple of days.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Solsberry, IN, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Push in cage: pros and cons

    How long do you typically wait after installing a queen with a push in cage before you check on her? I just installed one for the first time ever using a push in cage (thanks for the design tip from Bush farms). I had made several splits off of a super strong hive but could never find the original queen after at least two thorough searches. There were several queen cells started so the hive was already queenless when I did the splits or lost the queen during the splitting process. They would not accept the queen in her original wooden cage (stinging through the screen). I installed her over some honey, capped brood and larvae with her attendants from the cage.

    Any thoughts would be appreciated.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Default Re: Push in cage: pros and cons

    If you make a large one like I do, she has a bit of room to lay. You can wait a week and by then they will probably have released her anyway. If not, you can. With a smaller one I might release her sooner as she doesn't have much room to lay. Then I'd go for four days probably.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads