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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auburn, GA USA
    Posts
    117

    Cool Treating for AFB/EFB

    I hear a lot of talk about being chemical free, does this include not treating for AFB/EFB. I have been using terrimicin/powdered sugar, is there something more effective? No I haven't had a problem, but don't want to chance one showing up.
    ! ! ! 4 years and STILL a bee-ginner ! ! !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default Treating for AFB & EFB Depends....

    On how many neibors you have. If you don't have alot of neibors, and don't bring in hives from other sources, you can usually get away without treating for either. But if you have other hives within your girl's foraging range, I strongly suggest you treat for both...spring and fall.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Jackson Co. , Indiana, USA
    Posts
    44

    Default

    I have read that you can rotate out your comb to help control AFB/EFB. I think the norm is rotate out old comb every 3-5 years. I can not say for sure this works but it can't hurt. Even if your neighbors dont have bees feral bees could still exist. I rotate comb and use terrimicin. I rotate on a 5 year schedule. I think it helps with swarm management (gives them more room) especially if the backfill with nectar. If you think about it you are only asking them to draw out 4 new frames a year. (Assuming you use 2 broad chambers with 10 frames) I replace 4 frames in the spring when they prepare to swarm or when the flow is on. Not a big deal for the bees. Some could say that takes away from honey production and they might be right......but if it does it is very little. I think this also helps with the build-up of other contaminates in the comb. ie...varroa/tm treatments if you use chemicals........Just my 2 abe lincolns..........

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,245

    Default

    Peggjam is correct in that if you have fellow beekeepers that cannot identify and control the foulbroods, it would be best to treat.

    Search American Foulbrood Control in New Zealand. Mark Goodwin and Cliff Van Eaton did studies and wrote "The Elimination of American Foulbrood Without the Use of Drugs." This book is one that should be in every beekeeper's library. Study it and become proficient in the methods they recommend and you can do away with treatments.

    I have had bees for 30 years and do not treat, but my hive numbers are few so I can check each frame in the brood chamber at least 3 times before the nectar flow starts. I have never had AFB and have had EFB on a limited scale. Follow good beekeeping practices and use a good bee and you will have no problems you can't handle.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,288

    Default

    >I hear a lot of talk about being chemical free, does this include not treating for AFB/EFB. I have been using terrimicin/powdered sugar, is there something more effective?

    I've never treated for EFB. Last time I used terramycin was 1975 or '76. Yes, that does include not treating for AFB/EFB. There is something much more effective. Don't treat. Treating masks the AFB and does not kill the spores and it props up bees that can't handle it.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beespests.htm#efb
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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