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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,300

    Default

    You are right about that. Almond pollination is a giant brothel, and we are the pimps,exposing our girls to strange diseases!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Shasta County Ca
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I appreciate the replies pertaining to the post and the others too. I think I have decided not to have the bees.

    I have no water source other than my pool.
    I have no shade.
    I don't want to upset the local beeks as you call them.

    I would, however like to someday have two hives of my own after I do more research and learn much more so that I might take good care of them.

    Ellie

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default Winter indoors in Idaho

    K&L

    What kind of building do you use for indoor winter? Also how bad are your winters? Thanks.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Paul, ID
    Posts
    13

    Default

    What kind of building do you use for indoor winter? Also how bad are your winters?

    We use potatoe cellars these are large buildings here. But are set up to hold potatoes at the same temprature for long periods of time. we set at 41-43 degrees. Very large fans are set to run for 30 min and off for 30 min.when the fans run they push air building pressure in the building drawing fresh air in and pushing old warm air out. When the fans are running you cant open the door because of the pressure. There are two bays to each unit, each having its own fans and set of controls..They can also be set up to refrigerate and all have humidicells for adding moisture to the fan blown air if it is needed to cool.
    Winters here are windy and not as cold as what you get for the most part. We do get below 0 for maybe a week we used to get snow but the last sevral years not to much. we had more rain than snow this winter we are definitley not mild but no where near what you have.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    We have been really cold this year....and windy...very windy. I been thinking about putting up a windmill..but knowing my luck the wind will quit blowing.

    I'm working on building "bee" houses to block the wind...and bears (hopefully).

    Do you grow them spuds ya put in them buildings?
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Quote "An acre is an area, not a distance. So "an acre away" doesn't make a lot of sense."

    I chuckled when I read this, only because people not from around here laugh at us when we talk about distances in minutes rather than miles. "my bee yard is about 7 minutes down the road"

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,162

    Default Training bees to a water source

    Ellie, I think the trick here is to exploit the fact that bees can be a creature of habit. The trick is to get them conditioned to an appropriate water source before the get a chance imprint on the pool. Could the pool be covered while the bees are initially imprinting on their water source? Also the spot you are training them to must be reliable, do not let it run out or they will go looking. Also I believe sea salt or mineral salts can make the water more appealing and provide some useful micro nutrients. All things being equal (attractive elements like chlorine) they will usually prefer the nearest water source. Floats valves or irrigation timers could help.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Bear Creek, Outagamie & Waupaca Counties, Wisconsin 54922-0176
    Posts
    26

    Default

    I agree 40 colonies per acre usually is the maximum unless you want the weakest hives robbed out. The exception is nectar flows. But without strong flows, like in clover or citrus or other orchard in bloom, anything over 40 will tend to promote robbing and weaker colony strength in general. You take a look at California holding yards and it is amazing any of the bees survive that ordeal.

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