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Thread: Fruit Press

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
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    1,095

    Default Fruit Press

    I have a couple of Acme screws about 18" long or so and want to use one to make a fruit press. I have gotten plans from various sources on the internet and like some of them with one exception. None seem to use a base with a pour-spout molded in for the juices to flow through. Commercially available presses have a coated metal base for the juices to flow.

    Does anyone have ideas for a plastic tub with a pour spout or some good suggestion of what to use that is readily available for the spout/base? Also, how about plans or do's & don't suggestions for a succesful press? I figure I have a few months 'til harvest. Actually, there won't be one with the fruit trees starting to bloom as the are aleady. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
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    595

    Default Press

    Greg that one I was telling you about had what would looked like an upside down hive top
    (3/4" plywood w/ a 2" rim around it) then a hole is drilled in the center edge. Put a bucket underneath it and there you go. Above that went a round barrel looking device(metal rings w/ 1"x1" screwed in to them) w/ a 1/2" gap between wood strips, w/ apples they dont fall through but using smaller stuff just make a cheesecloth bag to put them in. For the top its just 2 pcs of 3/4" ply topped w/ a 2"x4" and covered w/ some metal U channel

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    611

    Default

    I made a fruit press w/ tray (and a copper pipe spout) all out of oak coated with bees wax. I use latis trays with flour sacked apples stacked up to five high and press them with a hydrolic jack

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
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    1,914

    Default

    Oh, oh, I'd like to see some plans!
    WayaCoyote

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    611

    Default

    Sorry I dont remember where the plans came from and dont have them any more. It seems to me they came out of a wine making publication

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Scotland, Connecticut USA
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Check your local library for a book called BACK TO BASICS from the Reader's Digest Press. It has a good diagram of a traditional two-tub press and also ideas for a couple of improvised presses.

    We have a single-tub cider press. At the bottom is a tray with sides. There's a groove that circles the tub carved into the tray; it leads to a hole at the bottom front of the tray. A piece of rather large plastic tubing leads from that to the big kettle we use to catch the cider.

    Hope this might be useful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,095

    Default

    I have a number of plans for presses, but they don't seem to use what I would like to see for a base. Many use wood, which I suppose is OK, but I'd rather use a plastic tub or other material of some sort. One would need to be tough and I could drill a hole for a bulkhead with tubing attachment or just a spout to direct juices into a bucket or tub. Most of the commercially made units have an enameled base with a spout shape molded. I can get something powder coated locally and that may be one route. Whatever is used needs to be very easy to clean and maintain.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    The cider press I have is essentially a large shop press, with molded HDPE cheese separators and tub. You can certainly have a stainless steel tub made, or buy HDPE from a supplier (or check out plastic cutting boards for this purpose at a local store) and cut the box to size and bond edges to the base. Here's an example. Interstate Plastics has some good pricing for HDPE cutting board material - 24"X36"X.5" is less than $50.

    MM

    If you do make a plastic tray, since the sides are not bearing weight, you could make them about 1 to 1 1/2 inches high, and use countersunk screws to join them to the base, using a food grade caulk to seal and form a bead at the join.
    Last edited by MapMan; 03-13-2009 at 09:09 AM. Reason: added

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