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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    UP michigan
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    Default spun vs. creamed honey

    Can anyone tell me what the difference is? I bought some of both the other day, I can see and taste the difference, I know how to make creamed honey, but spun is new to me. Thanks,

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Macon, GA USA
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    Default

    I think a lot of folks use the terms interchageably -- to mean finely crystallized honey. However, I'm starting to think that at least some spun honey is actually nothing more than honey with a lot of air incorporated -- like whipped honey. It's still very spreadable and not drippy at room temperature and "acts" like creamed honey. But every container of spun honey I've seen will run where as most crystallized honey will not. The two times I've tried to use spun honey for seed, it did not work well at all.

    Maybe in some cases, honey will crystallize using the tiny air bubbles as seed. I have seen some honey crystallize very quickly and smoothly after being run through a honey pump which aerates it.

    I'm curious to know if others have the same experience.

  3. #3
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    Default

    This stuff that I bought is very lite and smooth, like butter, white in color, no crystals on the tounge that I can feel.

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  4. #4
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    Nov 2004
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    Camas, WA
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    Default

    That is the way that creamed honey is supposed to be. The stuff that I make is similar to peanut butter in texture at room temp. As it gets colder it is harder to spread and when it is warmer it is easier.

    It sets up quickly (about a week) so the crystals are very small. Too small to feel on your tongue. I love the stuff. You don't have to worry about it crystallizing because it already has.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Ok, that's what I would thought. The stuff I bought before that was creamed must of had bigger crystals. The stuff that is like butter is great. Thanks for the info. I'll try to use some of this for seed.

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    Default

    Same thing. The quality is based on the size of the crystal you introduce into the honey after heating it, the temperature you "cure it at" and the quality of the base honey you use.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Reno, NV USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joel View Post
    Same thing. The quality is based on the size of the crystal you introduce into the honey after heating it, the temperature you "cure it at" and the quality of the base honey you use.
    Crystals between 20 and 30 microns feels creamy ->

    The human tongue evidently stops detecting grit when particles become smaller than 50 microns. Yet, if the particles get too small—less than, say, 15 microns—our same human tongue experiences those particles as gummy and yucky. In the middle is a sweet spot where we experience 20- or 30-micron particles of cocoa solids floating in their own cocoa butter as silky bliss.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Hays, Kansas, USA
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    Default

    Some are using the term 'spun' honey rather than creamed. This prevents confusion with some consumers thinking you are adding cream to the product. Some consumers are easily confused.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2006
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    UP michigan
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Swobee View Post
    Some are using the term 'spun' honey rather than creamed. This prevents confusion with some consumers thinking you are adding cream to the product. Some consumers are easily confused.
    Ain't that the truth. People are so far removed from production Ag. anymore that they have no idea how any of it ends up on the store shelf.

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Hays, Kansas, USA
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    Default

    Speaking of store shelf... you can't find creamed honey anywhere in this town! None of the stores carry it that I can find and one has only a small section on a shelf with honey. I had to order starter from a supplier. Not long ago, the same store carried a large number of brands and flora of honey products.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Orlando, FL
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    Default

    How can one ensure that the crystals are smaller than 30 microns.

    It seems that batches are getting larger and larger crystal size after 4 successive batches.

    Is there some kind of super fine (20 micron) filter than can be used?
    Troy

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
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    948

    Default

    The only way to get honey through a filter that fine would be to heat it which would destroy all the crystals. The answer may be to grind all the creamed honey used for seed.

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