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Thread: Crp

  1. #1
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    Default Crp

    My farmboy cousins in Kansas are saying that USDA is withdrawing funding for CRP land, will now be going back to dryland corn & milo.

    Anybody else hearing this? I thought there were the pollinator enhancement thingies coming up but...Of course the gravy train is over.No $$.

  2. #2
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    The only thing for the bees in WI CRP land is golden rod. It's about time the Gov stopped wasting its money on this foolish ideal anyway. Aren't they just paying the farmer to not make his land as productive as it could be. They say it is for the wildlife while they destroy the places the wildlife already has for their pansey palace city slickers idea of living in the great outdoors(next to the only 20 trees they didn't cut down and call it a wooded lot). Sorry, had to vent a little.

  3. #3
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    Default B slave

    Ah here ya don't get me started either

    Sure was nice for the bees in some places though: clover, alfalfa..

    And did foster soil conservation, a big deal in some areas..

    Also a hunting tourist season in these hurtin little farm towns..

    So what do you know about it?
    Last edited by Tom G. Laury; 03-08-2009 at 11:07 PM. Reason: mistake

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Ah here ya don't get me started either

    Sure was nice for the bees in some places though: clover, alfalfa..
    Maybe by you but not here

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    And did foster soil conservation, a big deal in some areas..
    So do proper farming practices

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Also a hunting tourist season in these hurtin little farm towns..
    Rabbits or miceOh yeh land of pheasants and whitetail

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    So what do you know about it?
    I also heard it was ending. Did you know it is ILLEGAL to place bees in a field that is in the CRP program? As is just driving in it not on the original field road.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 03-09-2009 at 12:00 AM. Reason: fixin the quotes

  5. #5
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    Default Placement

    No, that was allowed as of 08, actually ON crp, without pre approval. That's one of the reasons I'm surprised it's ending now, but I can see why!

  6. #6
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    Default Hey dude

    You quoted me to something I didn't say!

  7. #7
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    Default

    I was told by USDA CRP inspector that bees could not be placed on crp fields in WI. They cover an area that the gov is paying to be in specified planting thus killing the crop they are paying for.

  8. #8
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    Default Crp

    How about anybody who actually knows what's going on?

  9. #9
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    Default Crp

    As near as I know there is still a number of CRP programs in place.
    There is a lot of CRP ground at the end of it's 10 year contract that will not & has not been put back into the CRP program.
    The reason for this is that the 10 year CRP program cash payments to land owners is low for what the land owner can receive as far as a cash rent payment from a farmer that wants to farm the ground.
    The CRP ground that was that was rolled back into the 10 year in some counties in Nebraska & the Dakotas in the past 4 or 5 years was required to be interseeded with 51% legumes.
    Problem with this is when the thistles get out of control, out comes the sprayers & this then kills the alfalfa & clovers.
    My brother inlaw that is taking 2 quarters out of the 10 year told me that last year he was sure that spraying was banned in all CRP ground.
    The quarter of CRP that we lease for hunting never did ever raise a good corn crop in a perfect year.
    This is how poor of ground this quarter is & so are many others.
    It just makes me sick when I see this ground that has been sitting idle for 2 terms
    ( 20 years ) get busted up & put back into row crop, & then a piviot tossed up on this ground to boot!
    I remember the farm bust of the 80"s all to well!
    And as I always tell people that a farmers & beekeepers worst friend is " greed "
    So here we go again!
    History does not lie, it is a collection of the facts!

  10. #10
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    As far as I know, CRP isn't being limited by agencies.

    Some CRP lands were plowed late last summer or fall because the producers who owned the lands expected greater profits by planting those lands than by re-enrolling them in CRP. This affected lands coming out of CRP in 2008, and these decisions were made when corn was $6 to $7 a bushel and soybeans were $12 to $13 a bushel.

    With grain prices back down, many producers around here have chosen to re-enroll land in CRP, if they can.

    The driving forces, so far as I know, are commodity prices and the expectations of greater profits, not an end to the programs.

    To be eligible for CRP, land must be "marginal" in some way. Sloped great enough to make erosion a potential problem, adjacent to a waterway, something like that, qualifies land as elibible for CRP enrollment. Producers cannot and could not take prime cropland and enroll it just to "take it out of production."

  11. #11
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    I hadn't heard of CRP disappearing completely, but the payment contracts were for typically 10 years. At that time, the payments stop and the landowner can either leave the land alone, till it as cropland, etc.

    The new farm bill (according to speakers at our state association meeting last week), allows bee foraging within and upon CRP now. Prior to that, it was at the discretion of the local agency who managed the CRP contracts whether bees were allowed or not. In Kansas, it was a county-by-county decision by the local NRCS- Natural Resource Conservation Service and suppported by the FSA offices, whether bees in CRP were considered 'harvesting' or not. My brother-in-law has removed a lot of land from CRP jsut because the contracts expired.

    We always just placed hives as close as possible to CRP and took a 'who am I to control their flights' attitude. If the apiary is actually sitting on non-CRP land, I figured they had no say-so. Should bees cross the road or driveway and incidentally end up foraging in the CRP... just try to stop them!

  12. #12
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    Hey Swobee sorry I missed the meeting. Yes we put the bees on the other side of the trail road or old homesite, etc., not actually on the crp, with full knowledge and approval of county office. Where I go everyone is so helpful to me with locations they are actually disappointed if you don't use their place! Sounds like some will be put back in to dryland but as mentioned earlier the poor sections will probably stay. I'm thinking of a few farms that will be really sad to see go back under cultivation plus of course then it will start raining in June& July too!

  13. #13
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    >Aren't they just paying the farmer to not make his land as productive as it could be

    I agree with the idea, it provides an incentive to leave some lands left to its natural growth. It allows the farmer to reap some income off the land while in the program. It benifets the wildlife that provides in the areas.
    You have to realize the land owner has the right to utilize thier land as they see fit, under certain bylaws and so on.
    Too bad some of it is comming out, but as you all know, that business.

    We participate in somewhat of a simular program, but it allows us to take from the land under certain conditions. One is a 20 year one time payment to leave the land to grass, allowed to use as pasture. The other is a Ducks Unlimited agreement to take hay off a duck habitat, only allowing us to cut after the ducks have nested,
    Works great, provides us with pride, and keeps us closer to nature.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  14. #14
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    Salley SC
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    Tom.. I didn't know you had Kansas Farmboy cousins. I just got back from there last week.

  15. #15
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    The influx of out of area hunters during season really helps these small towns' economies, helps finance a few improvements. In the underpopulated counties it's hard to even support the old movie theater.Point being, CRP has many secondary benefits.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beeslave View Post
    The only thing for the bees in WI CRP land is golden rod.

    Clover and pheasants?

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