Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Nosema

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grafton, NY, USA
    Posts
    190

    Default Nosema

    I think my 2nd "surviving" hive has nosema. This hive seems less active than it was a last month when we had a day warm enough for them to break cluster and come out for cleansing flights. Also, this hive also had very low honey reserves, so I ended up pouring granulated white sugar on the top of the inner cover in hopes that if they were starving that they would be able to have a nearby source of feed.

    I am hoping to get some entrance feeders as soon as I can (hoping to be able to get them tomorrow, but it may unfortunately be another day or two before I can get them.)
    I am planning to make up fumagillin in with some sugar water.
    I also have some HoneyBHealthy too that I was planning to add to another entrance feeder too. (Is it OK to do both feedings or should I do the fumagillin treatment first and then after that provide the HoneyBHealthy feeding?

    I think there would be enough room to put both feeder on the hive and then narrow off the entrance with a reducer as well to hopefully keep the other hive from robbing this one...although it may be too late already...there were a lot of dead and dying bees outside the hive when I got out there this afternoon.

    I also plan to do the same to the other remaing hive which from all accounts has enough stores remaining, and in doing so I am hoping to keep this one alive and healthy and hopefully make a split from it next month.

    But, regarding the "infected" hive #2, what should I do about this one? Will the fumagillin treatment treat and clean up the hive?
    or will I always have problems with nosema if I do not put them onto new frames in which case they would need to draw out new foundation and therefore would need to be fed regularly and it is still freezing and snowing here? (It's still winter here but I am praying that spring comes a bit early this year.)

    Also, I had another hive that died out this winter. It had swarmed in MidSeptember and I fed them some in the Fall, but they were a small cluster going into Winter and I'm not surprised that they did not make it. I'm pretty sure they starved as many had moved up into the hivetop feeder and died in there. But, if it also had been weak from Nosema, how would I know? Should I be able to somehow disinfect the drawn comb or should it be melted down and the plastic frames somehow disinfected and if so how should I plan to disinfect them ?

    TIA!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    feeding syrup in freezing temps can be hard on the bees. Might chill them. The dry method might be best for a while or introduce a frame of honey if you can or a frame of feed from a dead hive if you have one. If they are not ready to break cluster dry or liquid feed will not help. A frame might be best for a short term.
    Once the weather breaks, and you can manipulate the hive, if it is a double, reduce it to a single. If it is a single reduce to a nuc if the bees are in short supply to conserve heat. Add some insulation to keep the heat in. As soon as the weather breaks add syrup with Fumigillan B. Make sure the feed is in the dark, IE a empty super and lid to cover. Fumgillan breaks down in record time, i think 45 minutes exposed to light.
    Good luck, get the bees tested or test yourself for varroa and nosema to see if the treatments are working. That will be the judge if the hive will come through this

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grafton, NY, USA
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by honeyshack View Post
    feeding syrup in freezing temps can be hard on the bees. Might chill them. The dry method might be best for a while or introduce a frame of honey if you can or a frame of feed from a dead hive if you have one. If they are not ready to break cluster dry or liquid feed will not help. A frame might be best for a short term.
    Once the weather breaks, and you can manipulate the hive, if it is a double, reduce it to a single. If it is a single reduce to a nuc if the bees are in short supply to conserve heat. Add some insulation to keep the heat in. As soon as the weather breaks add syrup with Fumigillan B. Make sure the feed is in the dark, IE a empty super and lid to cover. Fumgillan breaks down in record time, i think 45 minutes exposed to light.
    Good luck, get the bees tested or test yourself for varroa and nosema to see if the treatments are working. That will be the judge if the hive will come through this

    Thanks! This is great advice!

    This hive had had it's telescoping cover and it's inner cover blow off and then it snowed and froze over while we were away over the Holidays. From he road nothing looked amiss so it was a few weeks after arriving homw before we found out what must have occured. When we realized what had happened we found the outer cover and then took the inner cover from the hive that died out next to this one (the one next to it was a suicidal hive ... it swarmed in Mid September ... I fed the remaining bees but they moved up into the feeder and starved...silly bees...i guess it's good that their genes are no longer in existence any longer)...

    But, I would like to save this 2nd hive if possible...as well as keep my third and seemingly healthy hive (healthy and strong)....

    I blocked off the entrance to the dead out hive...and reduced the entrance to the 2nd hive who's health and strength are in question, in hopes of avoiding/stopping any (?additional) robbing ... I am not sure if the bees outside the 2nd hive were from the hive itself or if it was after affects of soem robbing... hoping it was not robbing, but I can't tell for sure...

    the 3rd hive appeared to be out and doing flights and HB's were seen a few hundred yards away by our house, so at least some bees appeared to be out and about.

    I'm guessing that the stress of the Arctic Holiday exposure didn't help the 2nd hive, but I'd like to save them if it can be done...the temperatures today were in the low 50's...but it's back to more winter type of temps for at least the next week: Mon: 32F | 18F; Tue:38F | 27F; Wed:45F | 23F

    Again, thanks for this advice!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    If you find a frame in hive #2 that has feed on it and you put it beside the cluster, remember to scratch the frame revealing the food.


    That dead hive i suggested to rob a frame from, If it died from disease, do not use it. Last thing you want to do is stress out hive #2
    What you can do however, brain fart, is, this is painstaking but might buy you time.
    Take an empty honey frame and spray in warm syrup solution. Then putting the warmed frame along side the cluster. I am unsure if you could add fumigilan then or not.
    Do not use that honey frame for honey if you put fumid in the syrup.

    Just a thought

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grafton, NY, USA
    Posts
    190

    Default

    I previously had poured some granulated sugar onto the outer cover.

    (positive signs):
    This weekend I popped up the telescoping cover and it appears that the bees were taking it and packing it into the open cells in the top super.

    I had closed off the entrance with a single entrance reducer in hopes of decreasing the chance of robbing and it seems to be working.

    (Now the less than positive signs):
    Since reducing the entrance, I now do not see much activity in or out of this hive. Although there is activity outside around it (ie- at the edges of the telescoping cover... I see bees landing and investigating it for a way in I'm presuming... at one point I had it propped so that there was enough space for the bees to enter or leave the top, but I don't believe that had still been the case when I added the granulated suger to the hive, but I'm not sure...all I know is that there does not appear to be any way to enter the top cover from under the overhang...it appears to be snug at the corners and sides all the way around.)
    I also see some random groups of bees congregating along the pallet that the hive is sitting on. I do not know if they are from the hive or not.
    Now I wonder if they also may have tracheal mites too.

    What temps and treatments would you be using in this situation.
    It's still not consistently warm enough especially overnights to start feeding (but I'm still fairly new so maybe I am assuming too much regarding the temps to start feeding).

    Any thoughts or suggestions are always helpful and appreciated!

    Thanks again!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    snip..
    at one point I had it propped so that there was enough space for the bees to enter or leave the top

    tecumseh:
    robbing? if yes...a good indicator of a weak hive.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grafton, NY, USA
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    snip..
    at one point I had it propped so that there was enough space for the bees to enter or leave the top

    tecumseh:
    robbing? if yes...a good indicator of a weak hive.
    Thanks! Yes, I know the hive is weak, hence my concern
    That is also why I added the dry granulated sugar feed as well
    I am pretty sure (but I can't be 100% positive) there were no cracks around the inner cover or the telescoping cover after placing the sugar in the hive and I also weighted down the telescoping cover with 2 large blocks of split firewood when I put the telescoping cover back on. *especially seeing this is the same hive that was open to the elements for a month during the winter...and most likely now why they are not as strong and healthy as they could have been without that It was a tough winter for this hive and I'm really surprised it held on this long! They are fighters! Hence why I'd like to be able to nurse it back to health.

    I guess I will just need to wait and see what they look like when it's safe to break into the hive. The temps are still fluctuating too much for me to feel safe breaking apart the hive boxes. It's down in the 20's to 30's at night and 40-50's during the day. When the drastic temp fluctutions stop and it remains above freezing for the most part, I'll start feeding fumagillin in case they have Nosema (versus plain dysentery.)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    syracuse n.y.
    Posts
    1,815

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NewBee2007 View Post
    I had closed off the entrance with a single entrance reducer in hopes of decreasing the chance of robbing and it seems to be working.

    Since reducing the entrance, I now do not see much activity in or out of this hive. I see bees landing and investigating it for a way in I'm presuming... at one point I had it propped so that there was enough space for the bees to enter or leave the top, but I don't believe that had still been the case when I added the granulated suger to the hive, but I'm not sure...all I know is that there does not appear to be any way to enter the top cover from under the overhang...it appears to be snug at the corners and sides all the way around.)
    When you went in the hives did you clean the BB. Most N.y beekeepers are seeing the bottom boards completely filled with dead bees, closing off the top entrance may have eliminated there only way in or out?? next warm day go down to bb, shrink the hive down, and if short of honey put the sugar back on and put the ?boardman? feeders on top of the inner cover. and cross your fingers.

    mike

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads