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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Female Black Widow

    Here is a image of a female Black Widow with her six egg cases that I found doing some spring cleaning.


    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    We run into these little buggers relatively frequently in our equipment and sometimes in the Honey House. Always sends a chill up my spine. Excellent picture for identification, they are a unique looking spider. Maybe you could get a get a shot of the hour glass, asuming she isn't a flat spider at this point! Looks like many more on the way.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default One Black Widow sunny side down.

    They do not bother me as they can not move to fast.
    I find them often because the bees are in the hills.
    Last summer I was killing 12-25 per day as I worked the bees.
    I placed one of those egg cases in a quart jar and let the spiders emerge. I lost counting them after 120!
    I will post an image of the hour glaas later.
    People should be informed obout the color markings of the jouvenile stage.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Also beware of the brown widow. I have seen a few of these in my garage amongst the stored bee boxes. They are tan with a orangish looking hourglass. The egg sac is the same size and color as the black widow's but has a lot of "spikes" protruding from it. Apparently the brown widow venom is much more potent than the black widow's, but they don't inject as much of it. Supposedly all widow spiders are very shy and will only bite when mashed against the skin. Kill'em all I say.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Kill'em all I say.

    Hair spray works real good.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Would that be straight hair spray or hair spray sprayed over a lit cigarrette lighter -- blowtorch style.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Default

    steve the brown widow venom is not as bad as black widow venom but still painful, the one to watch out for in here in Ga is the Brown Recluse, it rarely kills but will rot the flesh away for a long time is some cases, look at some of these pictures. http://www.emedicinehealth.com/spide.../page11_em.htm
    Ted

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    western ny alden
    Posts
    73

    Big Grin

    whew so glad im still in the freezer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lenoir, NC, USA
    Posts
    6

    Default

    We get those around here pretty frequently, I ran across one the other day when checking my hives. My son tells me that Greer Labs here in Lenoir, NC buys them from time to time when they are making Anti-venom. I've never tried to sell them any myself but I hear they pay decent money for them. As frequently as they show up in hives here maybe I ought too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joel View Post
    We run into these little buggers relatively frequently in our equipment and sometimes in the Honey House.
    Bought some nucs from Loris, SC once. Came back with Black Widows under the bottoms. I had an employee at the time who was "into" bugs. Anyway, he kept that spider in a mason jar for 2 years, feeding it flies and cleaning the jar out periodically.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Would that be straight hair spray

    No frame.
    Windex with ammonia works too.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    TwT, I checked out those pictures. All I could say the whole time was holy cow and oh my God. The spider itself is also kind of creepy looking and I don't mind spiders

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Townville, SC
    Posts
    151

    Default

    All of a sudden we are finding a lot of them in yard the last few weeks before then I only seen one in the last five years here. The other day I was picking up a board in the yard with my bare hands and I looked down and there was one on my wedding ring. As I got it off my hand I noticed liquid on my ring. I think it bit me on my ring. It made about faint. It definitely made me start wearing gloves.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default I noticed liquid on my ring

    If the liquid was white, you got pooped upon.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    575

    Default

    I love honey bees...but I have great disdain for spiders! Especially Black Widows. But then again, I never found a spider that I was fond of. If I come across any around my hives when checking on the bees, I introduce them to the sharp end of my hive tool!
    "My child, eat honey, for it is good." (Proverbs 24:13)

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,256

    Default

    I think spiders are quite incredible, and look forward to seeing them. They don't eat much, and really aren't much of a problem. The large brown Wood spiders we have are so beautiful. And the jumping spiders...do you know those? When I find one on a hive, I'll hold my hand out, and she'll jump right on board. Jump from hand to hand to hand, and back onto hive. They're my favorite. Look at their faces. Jumpers have their eyey facing forward so they have stereo vision and depth perception. Maybe the coolest spider I've ever found on/in my hives was a green toothed jumper from Florida. Quite a bit larger than our Vermont jumpers, and they have forest green fangs. Really a cool spider.

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