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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    122

    Default Anybody know how to make jam or jelly with honey?

    I want to try making jam this summer, canning it, even selling it at markets or giving it as gifts.
    But it makes so much more sense to use honey rather than all that sugar, doesn't it?

    Any tips- I can't imagine you can do an exact switch of sugar to honey...

    Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williston, FL, USA
    Posts
    39

    Default

    http://www.pickyourown.org/Susbtitut...eyForSugar.htm

    I found this a while back and had it bookmarked. I don't think you can take out all of the sugar in canning recipes because it's needed to make the product jell properly? Not sure, but my brain wants to remember something like that.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Now, that is weird, Dirtslinger - I was looking up the same thing today! Great minds think alike. Search the internet using the phrase "jam using honey recipe", and you'll find your answer.

    MM

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Atchison, Kansas
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Order the cookbook "Putting it up with Honey" runs about $15. It has several jam, jelly and preserves. It is full of canning with honey recipes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    144

    Default

    There's a product called Pomona's Universal Pectin that you can use in place of Sure Jell, and that works with honey. It's sold at health food stores, and one box will make several batches of jam or jelly. Pomona's is much easier to use than the other pectins, and allows you to adjust sugar amounts and make your own recipes, which would end in disaster for the grocery store pectin.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Kingston Springs, Tennessee
    Posts
    32

    Smile Honey to sugar conversion

    Hey there,

    Most cookbooks and I believe even the Honey Board recommend using 3/4 C honey for every 1 C of cane sugar in recipes. This allows for the extra moisture you get with honey that you won't get with regular sugar and it also accomodates for the 'extra' sweetness that you get from honey since it's sweeter than sugar.

    I've been cooking with honey instead of sugar using this substitution for about 30 years and have found that for recipes that are naturally moist (cakes, cookies, bread, etc.), I tend to use a 'short" 3/4 cup by a few tablespoons less. For liquid based foods like jelly, fresh cranberry sauce, and most anything else that starts out as a liquid and will be cooked over time, there's usually another indicator of when the food is ready so if you add too much by chance, you'll just have to cook it a bit longer. For example, when jelly is ready for putting into a jar, it can be identified by the way the jelly drips off the spoon - that's what you're looking for.

    Hope this helps. If you can get the hang of cooking with honey, your food tastes better and your company will always ask what the difference is between your creations and theirs. It's a subtle difference but one that people with super sharp taste buds often pick up on.

    Linda
    Think like a bee - focus!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Altamont, NY USA
    Posts
    91

    Default

    In the Vermont Beekeeper's Cookbook, they have a recipe for "sunshine preserves" using one part honey to one part fruit by weight. I made it using blueberries-it was very good, but very sweet-you don't need to use a lot.

    Jennifer

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