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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Hualien, Taiwan
    Posts
    3

    Exclamation Need Help in Taiwan

    This season has been a bad one in Taiwan for varroa mites and my teacher gave me some product to treat my hives. Brand name Gubitol, active ingredient 1-naphthyl n-methyl carbamate. It is mixed with water and sprayed directly onto the bees.

    Does this ring any alarm bells for anyone?

    I did a google search and it is bayer's Sevin, the infamous bee killing insecticide banned in more than a few countries. He said it was a new product, that he had been using it for about 8 months, and that it wasn't as good as the older chemicals he had used in the past. Most commercial bee keepers here are using it and I can attest to the lack of massive die offs in the hives. It seems to be getting rid of the mites with few side effects.

    I am perplexed. Has anyone ever heard of this before? I have a really bad feeling about it...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,637

    Thumbs down Sevin

    Sevin.
    That about the last thing that you want in your hives!
    Talk to your teacher and see how "his" hive dwindeled over the next few weeks.
    Once it in the comb it stays.
    You have better choices for mite control!
    Please take a look at the Pest and diseases section of this forum.
    Good Luck,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Jefferson Co,WV, USA
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Gubitol is dangerous stuff in concentrated liquid form. It is the active ingredient in CheckMite+ Coumaphos a non-volatile, fat-soluble organophosphate with ectoparasitizide properties, in high doses it can kill bees and some mites are resistant to it.

    IMHO I would not use this even if paid to especially in that form, I would try EO's, EO derivatives (Thymol), the WV FAF (http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/varroa/FormicAcid.pdf) long before I would put that in my hive, but others will disagree

    If you use it I would follow ALL of the safety & dosing instructions to the letter after testing to see if the mites are restant

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    York, South Carolina
    Posts
    137

    Default Tiwainbees Verroa mite

    I do not treat my bees but if it became necessary I would use the powered sugar method. It has proven to be very effective and it's very easy and simple to do.
    Hope this helps
    Barney
    What\'s smarter than a talking Parrot-----A spelling bee

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Hualien, Taiwan
    Posts
    3

    Default Thanks for the help!

    Found out what it actually is. Coumaphos. And reading about it give me the shivers:

    The organophosphate insecticides are cholinesterase inhibitors. They are highly toxic by all routes of exposure. When inhaled, the first effects are usually respiratory and may include bloody or runny nose, coughing, chest discomfort, difficult or short breath, and wheezing due to constriction or excess fluid in the bronchial tubes. Skin contact with organophosphates may cause localized sweating and involuntary muscle contractions. Eye contact will cause pain, bleeding, tears, pupil constriction, and blurred vision. Following exposure by any route, other systemic effects may begin within a few minutes or be delayed for up to 12 hours. These may include pallor, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headache, dizziness, eye pain, blurred vision, constriction or dilation of the eye pupils, tears, salivation, sweating, and confusion. Severe poisoning will affect the central nervous system, producing incoordination, slurred speech, loss of reflexes, weakness, fatigue, involuntary muscle contractions, twitching, tremors of the tongue or eyelids, and eventually paralysis of the body extremities and the respiratory muscles. In severe cases there may also be involuntary defecation or urination, psychosis, irregular heart beats, unconsciousness, convulsions and coma. Death may be caused by respiratory failure or cardiac arrest (19).

    Some organophosphates may cause delayed symptoms beginning 1 to 4 weeks after an acute exposure which may or may not have produced immediate symptoms. In such cases, numbness, tingling, weakness and cramping may appear in the lower limbs and progress to incoordination and paralysis. Improvement may occur over months or years, and in some cases residual impairment will remain.

    This is one of the scariest things I have ever knowingly come into contact with. I think I am going to try to get my hands on something else...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,791

    Default

    Just to try to clear some of this up, Gubitol is typically listed as containing coumaphos, an organophosphate. Did the label actually list carbamate as the active ingredient? If it did, the carbamate is not coumaphos.

    And not all carbamates are "Sevin." Sevin is carbaryl, one of the carbamates. Carbamates and organophosphates have similar modes of action, but are not interchangeable as families of pesticides.

    Also, before readers worry too much about the symptoms listed for poisoning by organophosphates, that list of symptoms is pretty similar to the list for any number of chemicals, including many that are not even pesticides. Think about "systemic effects" produced by alcohol -- yet many humans willingly consume alcohol, let alone handle the stuff.

    Coumaphos is still used in the livestock industry to control insects in or on livestock, including animals produced for slaughter.

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