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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Default Moving hives and supers without a pickup

    I am one of those beekeepers that does not have a truck. I usually borrow the company truck but it is a pain to get and return. I have been thinking of getting one of these guys. I am a little concern with it snapping right off while going down the road. I do have a heavy duty trailer hitch on my car though.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    575

    Default

    If you have a trailer hitch on your car...then see if you can invest in a small utility trailer or perhaps borrow one of your friends lawn mower trailers to move a few hives. They work great...just strap your hives down and go!
    "My child, eat honey, for it is good." (Proverbs 24:13)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    I have thought about that but you need to get a tag for it and then store it. I was thinking this for tow hives at a time or fill it up with supers. It looks like you could put three rows of boxes on it.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Default

    I have one I use for camping... it was inexpensive and rated to 500 lbs. I do worry about torqueing it too much, in spite of the bracing, so I balance it well. But it carries our firewood and some equipment just fine, and we use it as a step into the camper on the truck. It can also be reinforced by ratchet-strapping the rear corners to the stake pockets on the truck (or I suppose the roof if you have a strong rack).
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sequim, WA
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Put them inside your car. I transported mine the in the airplane. No one complained.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Adventures

    Just like the commercial guys, hobbyists can also have adventures moving!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    One of the most important experiances in beekeeping is the purchase and/or building of the the infamous bee truck. Most of us start out hauling bees in our vans or station wagons, eventually we have (or make) something dangerous happen (this works best when the spouse is present) and find an excuse to buy a truck. The 1st. one ususally isn't pretty, It isn't necessarily dependable, but you'll have pictures of it loaded with hives or honey supers, hanging on the wall, right next to the kids, the wife and the grandparents for everyone to see!

    Do a search, their all here in photo and word!

    "I transported mine the in the airplane. No one complained. "

    Dying to hear the rest of this story!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sequim, WA
    Posts
    79

    Default

    I can just see you haulin those girls in the back seat of the family car. You must be a good talker gettin your wife to help out.
    I strapped them together in the airplane with two, not one strap, early in the morning.
    I had two hives in the back of the 180 and went to Homer about one hour away. It is kinda awkward getting them in an out cause they are so heavy.
    It worked, no one got stung.
    Reminds me of a guy that said he would have been here earlier to get a swarm but he went around a corner to fast and two hives feel of the truck in the middle of the intersection.It was back before I keep bees.

    It's snowed a foot yesterday.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    651

    Default

    Most of the carry racks I have seen like above are very sturdy. Good for the weight they are rated at.

    The problem I tend to perhaps see is: my supers tend to shift a little, sometimes even when ratcheted down. Of course this is probably an operator error and I am sure you would pay much more attention to detail than I!

    With the rack when I arrive home from my yard the supers most probably would be behind me somewhere down the road!
    sc-bee

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    OK Joel,

    If I understand correctly you are telling me to purchase this thing. Overload it when my wife is with me in the beeyard and make sure it fails driving down the highway. By doing this my wife will give me the blessing to purchase a truck for beekeeping. Am I missing anything?
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    North Bend, WA
    Posts
    504

    Default

    I haul coolers full of salmon on mine. I don't see any issue with hauling a hive or two.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    That's pretty close Magnet
    OK, here's how I did it.

    Went with a friend, who was in a seperate vehicle (I had a station wagon sans wife) to a remote location which had two of the most dilapitated looking hives you could imagine. The first thing I did was to flatten a tire driving into the woods to load, that only took 20 minutes to change but now it's getting close to dark. After an hour of duct tape, newspaper and screen (I know but it looked really doable in the Keith Delaplane movie) we loaded these monsters (loaded with bees and honey in August) in the back. On the trip home one of the hives shifted. I can assure you there are few things more terrifying than looking at a wave of bees crawling towards you in the back of a station wagon by the light of the radio, except perhaps the look on my wifes face looking at a wave of bees coming towards us in the back of a station wagon. Between swerving while looking back at the bees and flashing my highbeams at my friend to get him to stop I failed to notice the trooper who was following me until his red lights came on. Of course with the eratic driving and flashing my lights he assumed I was having a road rage episode with the guy in front of me and was not real plesant. By now my wife is absolutely beside herself because she even agreed to go on this adventure in the 1st. place. So here we are, a half hour from home, the trooper, my friend, me, my wife and a carload of really unhappy bees along a busy interstate highway.

    Today I have 2 one ton trucks, a 1/2 ton truck, a 16 ft trailer and my wife hasn't been on bee trip with me in 10 years.

    Need I say more

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Circleville, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    38

    Default

    you would have to really watch not to overload. A full deep is 90#. A full double is 180# and three hives like mention is 40# overwieght, not counting full supers of honey. I would make sure it was balanced too.
    How about removing passenger seats, hives inside and wife rides the rack?
    Help your own self, the Government is to busy savin' their self.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Saltcreek View Post
    you would have to really watch not to overload. A full deep is 90#. A full double is 180# and three hives like mention is 40# overwieght, not counting full supers of honey. I would make sure it was balanced too.
    How about removing passenger seats, hives inside and wife rides the rack?
    Interesting idea. When I was a teenager, I took the back seat out of a car and hauled a large Hampshire sow hog in the back seat area to a boar about ten miles away to have her bred. If it can be done with a sow, it can be done with bees. After the sow, the car did not smell very well though. But I think she enjoyed the ride and the visit.

    I didn't have a wife at the time and it wasn't my car. Actually, it was the owner of the car that proposed the idea. He was a very good friend.
    Last edited by Galaxy; 03-07-2009 at 07:28 PM.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his contribution. Charles Koch

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Default

    I just took the seats out of my mini van.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auburn, GA USA
    Posts
    117

    Big Grin How to get a truck

    I started moving hives by folding the rear seat in the blazer and loading the cargo area with them. After 2 or 3 trips the wife was searching for a cheap pickup.
    ! ! ! 4 years and STILL a bee-ginner ! ! !

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Darrington, WA, USA
    Posts
    544

    Default

    I think im going to go buy this....and a good hand truck

    Maybe....

    http://seattle.craigslist.org/oly/ctd/1059805485.html

    JoeMcc
    "Slow Down and Taste the Vanilla" - My Grandma

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    chilliwack, bc
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Joel

    You make it sound so easy Ha Ha.
    Will Gruenwald Chilliwack BC

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Whatcom Co., WA
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Joe- not sure if what you are looking for is a trailer to load up as many colonies as possible on, but....I might suggest a trailer with the wheels under the deck. Higher to lift, still more usefull in my humble oppinion. HOWEVER, I did have at one point a trailer like the one you are looking at but where the deck was only 7" off the ground... good= for the hand truck bad= on most beeyard roads

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Brewster, NY USA
    Posts
    52

    Default

    A U-Haul trailer is ~$20/day. For the number of times you need it and the hassle of anything else, I think that's worth it.
    Whatever you believe you can or cannot do, you're right. - RusticElementBees.com

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