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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mansfield, OH
    Posts
    99

    Default Other crop pollination??

    I know that bee's pollinate alot of crops, and i know that alot alot of people take there bees to apples, almonds etc. Just wondering what your guys input was on trying to get some pollination contracts from farmers in my area of soybeans and other crops. There are no huge apples farms, or anything else in ohio so i was looking at exploting other crops and seing what your input would be first.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,218

    Default

    I doubt that you could get a soy bean grower to pay you for pollination, but give it a try. If I were you I would look for some squash or melon growers.

    Are you going to the TriCounty Beekeepers Conference? You could probably get some good advice there about where to find work for your bees.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Auger Hole, MN
    Posts
    433

    Default vine crops

    pumpkins, cucumbers and melons are an option. a melon blossom must be pollinated same day it blooms or will not bear fruit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    The cucurbits are a good start, roadside pumpkin stands could move a lot of your honey too. Maybe micro-scale pollination using a single or nuc for somebodies garden...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Default soybeans

    I found studies which showed that while soybeans were self fertile pollenation increased yield by 10%-40%. While they might not be willing to pay you to pollenate that might help get you access to the bloom for honey making.

    Do you think it worth the yield to haul in for honey? In our area they bloom after our primary flows and when nothing much else is going on.
    Last edited by wfarler; 02-21-2009 at 09:08 AM. Reason: can't type
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mansfield, OH
    Posts
    99

    Default

    wfarler: i would not have to move my bees at all to get the soybean bloom, there are hundreds of acres surounding me as i live in a rural area. I'm just trying to exploit all posible options for me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Default Melons

    I've been asked occasionally about supply hives for melons and cucumbers in a area that is producing area around 100 miles from me. Avoided in the past because I was working full time and didn't want to mess with it. With retirement not far away I'm getting more serious about it. I can also get yards that are closer to this area than my farm home.

    Any advice on pollinating melons would be greatly appreciated.
    1. Advice on avoiding pesticides and herbicides during pollination

    2. How long after planting do they typically want you to come in, and how long do they want you to leave the hives in? should i plan on feeding before/during/after?

    3. What's the best way to connect with growers? extension agent, buyers, driving the farm roads, posting a notice at the seed store, other ways?

    4 And finally how many hives would you suggest I would need to run to make it really worth it? I am trying to stay with a truck/gooseneck under 10,000 lbs just to keep my capital down or a flatbed dragging a fork.

    Anyway appreciate any advice, sorry for all the questions
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake Park, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    155

    Default we pollinate melons on Fla.

    You'll need to feed them on watermelons some because watermelons aren't nectar produces that much. We usally let them stay a long time because they are close to dad's house. But I think in about a month or 2 is enough to pollinate the fields. Dad has lived in the area he's in for over 30 years so he's just known by the farmers as the bee man. But if I were starting I may would post a flyer or cards at the farm supply places. If someone has ask that's one and he may know others. Dad has used the same setup you talk of 1 ton flatbed and swinger lift for years and seems to work for him. He just got the gooseneck and what I don't like about it is you need a lift and can't pull lift and gooseneck at the sametime. Dad has run between 600 to 1000 depending by himself with 1000 being a little much for one person I think of his age. As far as the sprays you need to research what they use but our guys don't kill our bees. I would recommend contracts too Dad don't use them he's still in the handshake era. But as you know sad to say everybody isn't. You can research contracts and they'll mention things to think of you may not have. I'm saying this of just Dad because I havn't been back working with him but for a year now after 20 years and we are increasing bees now like crazy. But you ideas have worked for him I'm not in his bank accounts so I don't know how profitable it has been but he hasn't quit in 30 years and he's 73 now.

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