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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whitsett,North Carolina,USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Hive identification for bees

    Has anyone tried or know if anyone using geometric shape (circle, square triangle, etc.) painted on the outside of the hive body to help the honey bees identify their hive from others. I know that painting the hive different colors works but 5 gal. of paint $$$$$.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    180

    Default

    You don't have to buy brand new paint. If you got a homedepot or other hardware store near you, they usually have paint that customers did not want because the color was off. So they sell those paints for much less than the usual price. Just make sure it is exterior grade paint.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,637

    Default using geometric shape (circle, square triangle,

    Here is what I did for a mating nuc yard:
    I painted some redwood 1 x 4 x 6"
    Red on one side and yellow on the other side.
    Blue on one side and green on the other side.
    I used my circle saw to saw to cut out the circles and used the hole where the drill cuts and centers the hole to fasten it near an entrance.
    I msde some 45 degree cuts on the 1 x 3 x 6
    I made some straight cuts on the 1 x 3 x 6"
    This combiation will give you different shapes and colors to place near the hive entrance.
    I will post some photos later--in about 2-3 days.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Andreas Ca. USA
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Perhaps some of them pretty colored sandpaper thingies my bride is always sticking to my shower floor?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    488

    Default

    There is an article in the December American Bee Journal under "Two good books for your winter reading". Bees, Biology and Management by Peter G. Kevan show some patterns that bees can discriminate between and shapes recognized by bees. They include circle, square, triangle, diamond, bar at an angle, 3 vertical bars, kind of a "Y" and an X. The article on this book finishes with the following:
    Read this book with this caveat: If you are not already a bee geek when you start, you will be one when you finish. Don't say you weren't warned. It is a treasure of a book.


    IF I can find it I will bring it to the class on Thursday.

    Ski

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,403

    Default

    I read that article about using geometric designs in ABJ. I found it very interesting. I plan to using something like that in the future. But it's really only need it you have a lot of hives in a row. Putting the hives in a slight arc will help with the drifting.

    I want to try using 2 tone painting the brood boxes. For example, paint the front of the box with green and brown. One box the top half is brown the next box the top half is green. I will also vary this by painting the halves not only horizontal but vertical and diagonal.

    Hope this makes sense.
    De Colores,
    Ken

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    471

    Default

    I have a set of stencils,10 different shapes,and 4-5 different colors of spray paint.Combine that with "oops" paint and no 2 of my boxes look the same

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I went to Michael's Craft store and bought some letters and shapes that I plan to use as soon as I get them painted. Something to fool around with.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,122

    Default

    What do those that dip their equipment in rosin/wax do after the fact? Paint doest stick after the equipment is dipped.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Weymouth, Massachusetts
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Can't you just take some sandpaper and rough up the area you want to paint a symbol on?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I don't know if it will work but what if I wanted to strengthen a certain hive with foragers. I thought I would just swap the wooden shapes and the bees would change hives. Yea, sounds too simple. lol

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,403

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie View Post
    Can't you just take some sandpaper and rough up the area you want to paint a symbol on?
    Bingo!!
    De Colores,
    Ken

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Default Hive identification

    As I am always out and about early, I swiped some stained glass from the wife"s hobby supply and made small panels from different colored glass while she was still snoring........... It does not stain, fade, drip etc. and the bees seem to like it.........Take care and have fun, I do....

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,637

    Default What do you do when--

    Please look at my posting # 3
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whitsett,North Carolina,USA
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie View Post
    Can't you just take some sandpaper and rough up the area you want to paint a symbol on?
    A possible solution besides wood shapes, would be color plastic sheets cut to the wanted shape. Check OfficeMax for cheap report folders.

    Cundald

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fair Grove,MO,USA
    Posts
    1,617

    Default

    I use numbered cattle ear tags and screw them to the front of there hive stand, if they forget their house number to bad. Jack

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,516

    Default

    I don't do anything and they seem to find their hives just fine. Is there some drifting...with 80k bees in a hive who is going to notice?
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Rathdrum, Idaho
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Why not use the stickers for putting the registration number on a boat? Weather proof and sticks like warm honey =]

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    471

    Default

    Don't know if my bees drift.They're not marked.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whitsett,North Carolina,USA
    Posts
    3

    Default % of drift

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Grimshaw View Post
    Don't know if my bees drift.They're not marked.
    There has been research on this:

    "The percentage of foragers originating from different colonies within the apiary ranged from 32 to 63 percent. Bees originating from colonies located 600 m away comprised 1.3 to 4.5 percent of the foraging force of the un-marked colonies."

    Source: http://www.actahort.org/books/288/288_12.htm

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