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  1. #1
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    Feb 2009
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    Jefferson Co,WV, USA
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    Default Apis cerana question

    the USDA Russians are Apis mellifera from the Primorsky Krai but show traits of Apis cerana and Primorsky Krai is solidly in A. cerana range is a hybrid of them. also is there anyone breeding A. cerana in the US it seem like a likely point to start for diversity and mite resistant traits.

  2. #2
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    Apis mellifera and A. cerana are separate species (unlike the races of honey bees that we talk about), and cannot produce viable offspring by interbreeding. Russian honey bees might show some behavioral traits convergent with traits shown by A. cerana, but they are not hybrids, and the two species cannot successfully hybridize to the best of my knowledge.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Well, it's not a "misnomer," really. A "misnomer" means that something has been given a misleading or an incorrect name.

    And I do know that cross-species (and even cross-genera) hybridizations can occur.

    But typically these hybridizations result in at least decreased fertility, if they're not completely inviable.

    I will check with some of the systematists that specialize on bees, but I repeat that to the best of my knowledge, Apis mellifera and A. cerana do not successfully hybridize.

  5. #5
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    Jul 2008
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    hamilton city, new zealand
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    Default

    but why dont the US keep apis cerana? There are a lot of gentle and productive ecotypes of cerana present in some of the eastern countries. They are even far better pollinators than the mellifera. They forager much earlier and later in the day than mellifera. They ever forage in marginal climate and develop faster than mellifera.

    If you can prevent swarming, there are ecotypes of apis cerana that build up large colonies like the italians and carniolans. They are much more disease and pest resistant than the mellifera bees.

    Here are a few links about Apis cerana

    http://www.beesfordevelopment.org/in...eep-varr.shtml

    http://www.beesfordevelopment.org/in...-in-apis.shtml

    http://www.kissankerala.net/kissan/k...ents/alied.jsp

    http://www.apimondiafoundation.org/c...5&categ_id=112

    http://beekeepingtimes.com/content/view/197/73/

  6. #6
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    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TodesSchatten View Post
    Please spend a couple moments to describe your
    links. A brief synopsis is fine.

    One of your links is to a frog and the other to sunflowers
    as near as I can tell.

  7. #7
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    Default

    evolution sometimes be facilitated by hybridization to create genetic super-combinations that are considerably more advantageous to the survival and reproduction of their owners than the gene combinations their parents possess.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0808081854.htm
    this article is on plants mostly

    in the wild female spadefoot toads, S. bombifrons, will mate with S. multiplicata a different but closely related species if it seems to ensure better survival for their offspring.
    http://research.unc.edu/endeavors/win2008/pfennig.php
    related animals

  8. #8
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    Those examples may work, though, because some "species" seem to be interfertile. Either completely or at least enough that they can successfully reproduce and produce offspring that can also perhaps reproduce at some level.

    I doubt that Apis mellifera and A. cerana are capable of interspecific hybridization.

  9. #9
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    A quick Google search picked up this:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=-5i...um=3&ct=result

  10. #10
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    Default

    thanks... so transgenic it will have to be

  11. #11
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    Sorry, you lost me. What needs to be transgenic?

    We have some mite tolerance traits that breeders are already working on, and I'm not sure that "diversity" is really as lacking as some on BeeSource make it seem -- at least I haven't seen problems related to a lack of diversity, such as an inbreeding depression, in the bees around here.

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