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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default Seeing the end of winter

    One more month and we will be seriously thinking of setting the bees out of storage,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default One more month

    It's getting time to dust off your hive tool.
    How do you exhaust the carbon dioxide build up.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    continuous air flow with a ventilation fan set up on a thermostat, which increases the air flow as the temp increases.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Life up North

    Hey Ian:
    How short do your days get around the end of December? No doubt you are looking forward eagerly to Spring!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    ya, we get about 8 hours of sun during those days,
    days are longer now,. Getting much more work done, its hard to accomplish anything with short days
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,338

    Default

    Well Ian, we had some hazelnut pollen coming in today. I saw a pussy willow in bloom as well. We were putting on the patties. Ridiculously low losses, less than 3 %. Bees are looking very good so far.

    Jean-Marc

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    I'm still huntingt for that darned GROUNDHOG!

    If I catch that little PIG I'm gonna throttle him...I can't take 6 more weeks of this!!! -Danno

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    >>Ridiculously low losses, less than 3 %. Bees are looking very good so far.


    wow, thats great news!
    How did you treat your mites last season?
    you guys really do have a wintering advantage over there. I know a guy that use to migrate his hives over to the west coast to pollinate, and winter his hives, to send them back for summer. It worked out very well until they restricted the movement of hives across the country.
    Seems silly doesnt it? What do we have that you dont already?
    But then, I guess that opens up another can of worms
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    UP michigan
    Posts
    214

    Default wintering shed

    That is quite the setup you built. Do you know what your losses are so far in the shed? I wouldn't of expected the dead bees taht you had in the pic. Even though they are in the dark, they must still take cleaning flights. We have an old potato shed on the farm that hasen't been used inyears, this gives me an idea as to what to do with it.

    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Camp9 View Post
    ..... I wouldn't of expected the dead bees taht you had in the pic. Camp
    Before we sent the bees to California we wintered some indoors and that type of loss of bees on the floor is typical. John had to sweep the floor between the stacks on a regular basis. They wintered pretty well inside and despite all the dead bees on the floor, there were still plenty bees left in the boxes.
    Sheri

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    UP michigan
    Posts
    214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK and Sheri View Post
    Before we sent the bees to California we wintered some indoors and that type of loss of bees on the floor is typical. John had to sweep the floor between the stacks on a regular basis. They wintered pretty well inside and despite all the dead bees on the floor, there were still plenty bees left in the boxes.
    Sheri
    I guess I was thinking with it being dark all the time the bees wouldn't clean the hives so well, or be that active. not sure what I was thinking but was just amazed to see they still were working so well.


    Camp
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,551

    Default

    Camp, I think it isn't so much that the bees are hauling dead bees out as it is the old bees crawl out of the hive to die.
    Sheri

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    In regard sweeping bees in wintering buildings, this might be something to consider. Many are not aware, but the dangers are real.

    Date: Tue, 20 Nov 2001 12:59:56 -0700
    Sender: Informed Discussion of Beekeeping Issues and Bee Biology <BEE-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU>
    From: Kenn Tuckey <kenn.tuckey@GOV.AB.CA>
    Subject:
    Re: BEE-L Digest - 14 Nov 2001 to 15 Nov 2001 (#2001-311) Indoor wintering
    I hope this is still relevant. I got distracted by other pressing matters - including a weekend! This is what Trevor referred to. Peter Dillon asked about potential dangers when wintering bees indoors. In March of 1995 Gauvreau, Sigler and Abbott published "Assessment of Airborne Molds as a Biological Hazard for Alberta Commercial Beekeepers." Gauvreau is a veterinarian and Sigler and Abbott are at the University of Alberta's Microfungus Collection. Sixteen Alberta beekeepers co-operated in the test. The report provides an impressive list of 82 molds that were collected during the study. It appears that some of the molds were innocuous but others had the potential to cause severe problems for anyone exposed. A couple of the statements from the report: "The presence of known toxigenic, potentially pathogenic and allergenic molds at all sites suggests that prudent action is needed to minimize worker exposure" "There appears to be a strong association between reported respiratory symptoms, eye, nose and throat irritation and the activities monitored (sweeping and Cleaning) where there was exposure to high levels of airborne molds". I suspect that copies of the full report would be very difficult to find but I wrote an article on the report that may be easier to find. The article is entitled "Danger in the Honeyhouse" and it appeared in the June 1995 copy of Alberta Bee News as published by the Alberta Beekeepers Association. Kenn Tuckey Provincial Apiculturist Alberta, Canada.
    My personal conclusion was that either the bees should be wetted down a little before sweeping, masks should be worn, and/or that a vacuum cleaner venting outdoors would be prudent.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    UP michigan
    Posts
    214

    Big Grin

    We'll there ya go Ian, you can use that grain vac.

    Camp
    Last edited by Camp9; 02-20-2009 at 12:04 PM. Reason: gramer
    As wonderful as this life is, there are days I really look forward to the next. :)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,338

    Default

    I used thymol. Some of us got an early registration for it. Didn't treat for tracheal. Levels were below 1%. We had a little bit of honey flow today, from pussy willows I guess. The years where we've had pussy willow flow have been vewry good for us. Usually it gets rained out. I also got a $370 tow bill after the commercial vehicle inspection dudes decided my truck was deemed unsafe to drive. Needed another $20 cab fare to make it home. Then mechanic starts tuesday, followed by about $150 tow to the vehicle inspection dudes. Fortunately the bees are good, my crew this year is very good as well.

    Jean-Marc

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    >>Fortunately the bees are good, my crew this year is very good as well.


    Bingo
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    >>That is quite the setup you built. Do you know what your losses are so far in the shed? I wouldn't of expected the dead bees that you had in the pic. Even though they are in the dark, they must still take cleaning flights. We have an old potato shed on the farm that hasn't been used in years, this gives me an idea as to what to do with it.


    No I don't , hives stacked three to four pallet high make hive assessment only through the front.
    It looks like a lot of dead bees, but its typical. I measure the amount of dead every winter to see how the year is measuring up. So I haven't had a chance to clean up to see. But by the looks of it, It will measure up less than other years at this time of winter. But the worst is yet to come.
    No they don't take cleaning flights. No movement outside the hive at all. The shed must be kept at complete darkness til spring or they will fly to the light. They get lost as soon as they venture to the light. Also temperature is important. It must be kept constant and cooler than warmer. That is where increased ventilation is essential during warm winter spells.

    >>We'll there ya go Ian, you can use that grain vac.





    >>In regard sweeping bees in wintering buildings, this might be something to consider. Many are not aware, but the dangers are real.

    very troubling. I always try to wear a mask when ever working in the shed for too long,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,338

    Default He's back...

    Old Man Winter that is. Pollen last week, about 5 inches of snow today. Bees look so good right now, got patties on all of them last week. Started round 2 on monday and we got stalled today because of weather.

    Jean-Marc

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    souris, manitoba, canada
    Posts
    758

    Default Yes , BUT EVEN with

    this set back, you are at least a month and probably 5-6 weeks ahead of me..............I'm in the manitoba banana belt, where its currently minus 23 celcuis and with 12" snow, including 2"of ice in it,and spring is coming slowly

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Default

    I am hearing that this spring is going to be cool and wet,
    NOt prediction I want to hear. We are going to have a late spring again this year, with the ground so wet, and the fields covered with a foot of snow. That dam ice doesnt allow the wind to remove the snow. Lots to melt, lots of moisture to absorb. With a cool April, we probably will not get on the land til May for sure,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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