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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auburn, GA USA
    Posts
    117

    Default Ross rounds vs cut comb

    Any thoughts on Ross Round compared to cut comb in a clam shell or even cut comb in a jar. I have dealers asking for comb honey, what will produce the best?
    ! ! ! 4 years and STILL a bee-ginner ! ! !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    Cut comb is easier, cheaper, messier, and I
    think (no facts here) you'll get more product
    with cut comb.

    I know people that really like the look of cut
    comb vs a "factory" look.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Woodlawn, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Last year (my first) I placed a super of thin foundation on and made cut comb honey on one hive. I did a combination of crush and strain with a piece of cut comb in each pint jar (I used wide mouth jars, so I got a pretty good size chunk in there). I sold out almost immediately just from word of mouth. I did have one person ask for it without the comb, but most of my customers really liked the comb.
    I think Ross rounds would be a great addition, and I am considering doing some comb in clamshells for customers that want only that. It would surely make a lot of product versus extracted honey, but I hate to make the girls work so hard to draw it out repeatedly.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Cut comb vs Ross rounds. Check your market!!!!!

    Been making comb honey for 25+ years. For the last ten years we've only done cut comb. I have tens of thousands of dollars of RR equipment and it sits in the old barn waiting for a brighter day. RR take alot of prep time, the overhead is higher and the buyers in my area don't want to give you a price worth making them. The only ones who want them (very few) are so picky that unless your on a Sage flow in an El Nino year you won't be able to get rid of many. We now do lots of cut comb. Takes time wax the frames with cut comb also. If your doing comb in our area you will need to charge 3x or more than bulk price to make up for lost time and the extra effort both you and the bees take making it. It one of the best sellers we have. Not the thing for huge commercial guys to do as its more of an art to make CC right. Customers love it. Especially the old folks who used to get it as a treat when they were young as well as kids who think it cool. Some folks arern't so keen on all the plastc with the RR as it seems to deter from the " all natural" image comb has. For some reason they aren't so concerned about cut comb in clamshells. Cut comb in the jar has by far the most pure reputation. When cut right the CC jars even have a better image than a whole frame without an open cell. If you really want to do RR don't buy alot of supers untill you see what the "market" will bear in your area. If you do thousands of them (RR)go to your local Home Depot an look for some day laborers to help clean them. Its a slow process.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lancaster CA
    Posts
    410

    Default

    I agree 100% with the above post. I got about $3000.00 worth of Ross Round equip. wax, rings, covers, supers ect. for $100.00. After a few years of using it, I sold $2000. 00 worth of that same equip, all I had for $500.00. The guy I sold it to never made a decent product with it. Cut comb is sooo much easier.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    We produced tens of thousands of Cobana, then Ross Rounds (same thing) mostly for the Japanese market, which was hot at the time. Producing rounds is definitely an art, and the customer is usually not 'mass market'. For any volume, you need a distributor, and there are a few who advertise looking for rounds in the US.

    If you are going to produce it for customer demand, be sure to get a substantial deposit up front (30%?), and don't overestimate your abiility to produce high quality comb until you have a few years experience. Specialties like orange blossom are hot sellers, (if you can call any comb honey 'hot').

    That said, rounds are best produced on single brood chambers and production can approach the expected yield on liquid honey production in skilled hands. In the North, comb production can affect wintering adversely, though, so be aware. I don't know about Georgia.

    All the above is a way of saying that I tend to agree with the others, for anyone other than the commited commercial rounds producer or small producer who only wants a few boxes and does not want the mess of cutting and draining comb. After all, cutting and packing comb is a bit of an art, too, and it does granulate faster in areas where the honey sets up.

    Comb is a perishable product. Some markets (Middle Eastern) don't seem to mind granulation, but American markets expect it to be fresh and liquid.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Rr vs cc

    Hey allenD and JJGbee

    Great advice.

    Was wondering if any of you guys ever used queen excluders will making cc or rr. To make the best RR you will need to slam full capped brood frames in a busting single on a hard flow to make the AAA product. With both RR and CC the bees will sometimes but drone up in them then. We used to use excluders over the singles but sometimes they wouldn't pass them even with bait while other times they would go right up and get to work. Who knows why. ????????????? I could never figure it out. Right now I skip the exluders and just get rid of the few drone combs. Not the best but better than the alternative of some "idiot" bees plugging out and then having no brood for winter bees.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,235

    Default

    I only produce a small amount of comb honey. But I do it using empty frames with a waxed starter strip above an excluder and between frames of already drawn honeycomb.

    I personally would not use any foundation for comb honey just because of the uncertain level of miticide contamination that is around now.

    Fuzzy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    We had quite a chat about excluders, pro and con, at http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...25370 recently

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default

    I think I'm going to try basswood boxes this year.

    Old school....

    K

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
    Posts
    314

    Default

    this has been helpful reading to me aswell

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auburn, GA USA
    Posts
    117

    Default

    Thanks for all the helpful info guys. I think that you have convinced me to stick with jarred comb and liquid honey. My total sales is from a joint roadside stand with the girl whose veggies my ladies polinate.
    ! ! ! 4 years and STILL a bee-ginner ! ! !

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