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  1. #41
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    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    Default

    Tom, if you google "recycling sewage treatment water", you will see that there are places in the world that treat waste water to the point where it is usable for irrigation and even drinking. Cost as always is an issue, but the math makes more sense as the scarcity worsens.
    Realistically, many cities get their water from rivers downstream from where another city dumped their treated water. It is a matter of dilution, filtration and treatment.
    I am not suggesting it is easy but plan A isn't working, we better start figuring out plan B. I'd at least be trying to avoid having to deal with that YUCK factor mentioned earlier as long as possible.

    There are ways to better allocate the rare and becoming rarer resource of water in a much smarter manner than we have traditionally done in this country in general but especially in the drier parts of the country in particular.
    Like another resource we don't manage very well, oil, we bury our head in the sand until a full blown crisis is at hand then face painful consequences that could have been avoided with a little forethought. Collectively, people can be so stupid.
    Sheri

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
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    2,479

    Default The yuck factor

    Would that be , like, e.coli?

  3. #43
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    May 2008
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    Fresno California USA
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    Default What

    Would be the better than traditionally done? What are you referring to?

  4. #44
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    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    Default

    I am not suggesting untreated sewage be sprayed on our tomatoes.

    Traditionally we mix the small amount of "sewage" a home generates with the large amount of grey water it generates and send it all to the treatment plants. Why not use that grey water to wash the car or water the lawn? Why not then send this grey water, treated as needed, to agricultural use?

    This link discusses waste water recycling
    http://www.austmus.gov.au/factsheets..._recycling.htm
    an excerpt:
    "However, it is possible to collect and reuse waste water in our homes, offices, factories and farms as it can be treated to the standards required for agriculture, industry and even drinking. Waste water can be redirected prior to treatment, such as when shower water is directly re-used for flushing toilets, or after treatment, such as when treated sewage effluent is used for irrigating golf courses and orchards." (my emphasis)
    Sheri
    PS The YUCK factor is the thought of drinking perfectly safe clean treated water that was recently in someone's toilet. Think Space Shuttle here. They drink recycled urine. http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-10097499-52.html
    There are cities doing this now.

  5. #45
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    May 2008
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    Fresno California USA
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    Default Rants

    Like mine about all the crowding out here

    Whaddaya do?

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Like mine (rants) about all the crowding out here
    Whaddaya do?
    Crowding and water shortage, uh, do ya think maybe they're related?
    I think y'all should require everyone coming into the state to have their round trip return ticket.
    Sheri
    PS Make them bring their own water with them.

  7. #47
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    May 2008
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    Fresno California USA
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    Default Good thinking

    Sheri re/; difficult problems


    First define: then move on;
    Last edited by Tom G. Laury; 02-22-2009 at 10:42 PM. Reason: No argue

  8. #48
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    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
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    2,479

    Default Everyone

    Except beekeepers, right?

  9. #49
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    May 2008
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    Fresno California USA
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    Default

    Gawd I love to stir the pot!!!

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
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    Default

    LOL, Tom
    In the case of beekeepers, we are special, they need us so badly out there, they should PAY us to come in. Oh WAIT, they do!!
    At least the out of state beeks leave; too bad so many of them come out there it skews the supply/demand equation and hurts pricing. The growers do love it though.
    Sheri

  11. #51

    Default rain barrel

    Very profound posts. If houses had rain barrels to collect runoff to water lawns and grey water was reused for flushing most of this would be a non issue. There are many areas in asia that do this now. We are such a entitlement society we feel that it is the other persons issue. We all need to take a roll in this. I have plenty of water but still use a rain barrel for water to the chicken coop. Rain water off the honey house to wash with. put a fine screen on it to keep bugs and leaves out toss in a 1/4 cup of bleach and you are ready to go. like the Nike commercial 'JUST DO IT'

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Fair Grove,MO,USA
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    Default

    Reclaiming water and recycled water has been going on for over a hundred years or longer. People build a house and go to one side of it, dig a hole and crap in it (septic tank and laterals ). Then go on the other side of the house and drill a well.(for drinking water). The reasoning i hear for this, is that after water runs through 10ft. of sand and gravel it's supposed to purify it. I wonder.Jack

  13. #53
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    OPP, Al USA
    Posts
    415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brooksbeefarm View Post
    Reclaiming water and recycled water has been going on for over a hundred years or longer. People build a house and go to one side of it, dig a hole and crap in it (septic tank and laterals ). Then go on the other side of the house and drill a well.(for drinking water). The reasoning i hear for this, is that after water runs through 10ft. of sand and gravel it's supposed to purify it. I wonder.Jack

    NO WAY 10ft of sand and gravel will purify water. That's why most rural wells are now "Deep" wells of 100 or more feet. Even then chloroform bacteria from human and animal waste can still sometimes be found. Ground water all around this country is constantly being found to be contaminated with chemical and bacterial content even at depth.

  14. #54

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HAB View Post
    NO WAY 10ft of sand and gravel will purify water. That's why most rural wells are now "Deep" wells of 100 or more feet. Even then chloroform bacteria from human and animal waste can still sometimes be found.
    While I'd agree that 10ft of sand and gravel wouldn't necessarily purify water, I'd argue that, at least in my neck of the woods, deep wells are now common because those deeper aquifers are more dependable. Coliform bacteria in wells is mostly the product of the bacteria 'spilling' into the well. Wells in pastures or too near septic systems are usually at fault. Coliform bacteria cannot survive a trip through the soil to reach even a relatively shallow aquifer. Once it penetrates even a few feet into the soil there is no longer sufficient oxygen for it to survive.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  15. #55
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    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fair Grove,MO,USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HAB View Post
    NO WAY 10ft of sand and gravel will purify water. That's why most rural wells are now "Deep" wells of 100 or more feet. Even then chloroform bacteria from human and animal waste can still sometimes be found. Ground water all around this country is constantly being found to be contaminated with chemical and bacterial content even at depth.
    I hope your not going to challenge the great minds sitting on the feed sacks at the local MFA feed store. That's where i got my info. and i have seen what happens to those who don't agree. My well is 340 ft. deep through gumbo and limestone so i don't worry. One thing i see happen alot around here is that when some of my neighbors have their septic pumped out they let them spray it back on their pastures. YUK, don't know if that's a good thing or not? Jack

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