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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Mike the Logger

    Took the words right out of my mouth...sometimes I think that an extended drought is the only thing that will save the state!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default It does seem a shame to keep all those L.A.lawns going

    Golf courses
    Golf courses
    Golf coursesand more Golf courses
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Lake Oroville level stats

    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Default

    Here is another local article:
    http://www.redding.com/news/2009/feb...lack-of-water/
    And here is what some are doing about it:
    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...e/100_0050.jpg

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,552

    Default

    I keep hearing about orchards being bulldozed because of water shortages but on the East side where we basically were I didn't see any orchards down except the old old trees and there was still lots of planting going on. Thousands of acres of new trees. So, why the discrepancy in location? Do the folks on the East side have wells or do they get more rain or was it just a coincidence that we saw what we saw.
    Sheri

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,157

    Default

    The east gets it's water through MID, TID ect... local water district, the west side of the vally gets a large amount from a canal from the Sacramento river, with the smelt issue and low run off they fall under State & Fed regulation.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,552

    Default

    Thanks Keith, that explains it.
    Would you (or anyone else) have any idea of what the percentage of trees in each area is? Is the lack of water on the West side, perhaps resulting in the increase of acreage in almonds on the East side, or are the new plantings just part of the projected increase we have known about for the past few years?
    Sheri

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    LA Co, Calif, USA
    Posts
    86

    Default

    West valley growers are drilling wells to try and get water. One grower just put in well -- went down over 1200 ft and spend close to a million dollars.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,157

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mbholl View Post
    West valley growers are drilling wells to try and get water. One grower just put in well -- went down over 1200 ft and spend close to a million dollars.
    Many growers are on a two year waiting list with the well drillers.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default

    Sheri I don't think anyone is planting in response to lack of h2o westside. Even east siders are extremely cautious about taking any risks right now with the price of nuts so low.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    LA Co, Calif, USA
    Posts
    86

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Golf courses

    Do look extravagant but we can learn from them. Virtually all of the courses surrounded by these "planned developments" are irrigated with reclaimed ( think sewage treatment plant) water. Probably saves on fertilizer too! Aren't the water hazards pretty? No swimming allowed.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Sheri I don't think anyone is planting in response to lack of h2o westside. Even east siders are extremely cautious about taking any risks right now with the price of nuts so low.
    That explains why peoples say I'm worthless

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,552

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    "Golf Courses"....surrounded by these "planned developments" are irrigated with reclaimed ( think sewage treatment plant) water.
    Yes, but wouldn't that water grow veggies too?

    Some Californians (thinking mostly city folk here) seem to have forgotten or more likely never understood they live in a desert.
    My grandfather had a couple acres in Santa Maria. His hobby was gardening. He had native and non native desert species as the basis of his landscaping. His one luxury was his collection of fruit trees, including walnut trees (but no almonds), which required watering. He did NOT have a lawn OR a swimming pool. We were taught to conserve water, even though he had his own well.
    I find it unbelievable that California is choosing the suburban swimming pools, lawns, car washes and yes, golf courses over water for growing FOOD. Don't they know where their groceries come from? If the city populations don't know, those making the decisions to allocate the water certainly do. But I suppose it comes down to how many farmers vote vs how many suburbanites do.
    And to top it off, some try to blame the problem on a little fish.
    Sheri

  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Water

    Reclaimed water as we know it now is best not used to irrigate food that will be directly consumed, health problems dontchano. I resent the impacts overdevelopment of housing is causing, water use being high on the list. However, growers in the Westlands water district ( The district with lowest priority ) are definitely not hayseed hicks. These are educated, scientific operations. They knew full well when they planted those trees that years would come when surface water would be extremely scarce. The reason they are at the back of the line has to do with their distance from the source of water, hence their lower priority rights.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Default

    It feels strange to be reading this:
    http://www.westlandswater.org/wwd/pr...llocation%200%
    while watching the rain pouring down outside.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,552

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Reclaimed water as we know it now is best not used to irrigate food that will be directly consumed, health problems dontchano.
    "as we know it now" is the key phrase here. There are ways to make it safe for drinking, (once you get past the Yuck factor) so perfectly acceptable for irrigating farm fields. And in the case of fruit or nut trees where there is no direct consumption it might actually be safer, from a public health standpoint, than spraying it on publicly trammeled golf courses.
    The percent of actual "sewage" in waste water is small. Grey water would need much less treatment to be safe for irrigation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    However, growers in the Westlands water district ... knew full well that years would come when surface water would be extremely scarce.
    Yes, I can see where that would be true. I wonder, though, if the fields under irrigation have expanded at the rate of residential water needs. In other words, are increasing water quantities being shipped past these growers to service growing Southern California cities?
    And I wonder if costs of water for nonessential residential use (or misuse in a severe drought) have risen to the point of hampering demand. If not, they should. Perhaps they should have done it before they were to this point of crisis. There aren't enough pool cleaning, lawn care or car wash jobs to employ those losing their ag jobs now, that is for sure.
    Sheri

  18. #38
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Safe food

    Sheri: what are you referring to? Reclaimed water is not suitable for use on food crops in USA. It's good for other uses though, reducing demand on cleaner water.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Demands

    Most of the west side perennials have been planted within the last ten years, paralleling the planting of houses every where else.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Reclaimed water

    Think about our export markets

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