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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,791

    Default

    Right. Sounds like that might be happening in New Zealand.

    Stocking hives with pseudoscorpions might be a challenge. First, raising enough or maintaining enough in captivity to serve as stock might be more difficult than it seems as face value. I don't know. I've never tried keeping any in a rearing program. Then, finding hives where suitable habitat for pseudoscorpions is available might be an issue, too.

    I'll be interested to hear what researchers might find on this topic. Pseudoscorpions are poorly understood in general, and research like this might add to the information collected about this group of arthropods.

  2. #42

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?


  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    Hey Bernhard,
    The video doesn't work.


    Glen
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bay Springs, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    You know... here in the south they thought that bringing in the alligator was a good idea to help control the beaver...I don't think it worked out too well.....and someone thought that kudzu would help with erosion well it does you cant see it, its totally hidden under the mass of vines that cover everything in sight at a growth rate of a few feet per day......

    and now something that would control varroa...... naa I don't think so.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    But with pseudoscorpians all you really have to do is stop killing them with acaracides...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Leicester, United Kingdom
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earwig


    these eat varroa.

    It is important to note whether there are any ants or earwigs present, since these insects eat varroa mites and can falsify the mite count obtained.
    (cut from some varroa treatment instruction)

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    4,969

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    Heterorhabditis indica nematodes kill small hive beetle pupa or larva.
    How do entomopathogenic nematodes kill small hive beetles?

    When the infective juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes are applied to the soil surface around bee hives, they start searching for their insect hosts such as larvae (grubs) or pupae of small hive beetles that are already present in the soil. Once larva and/or pupa has been located, the nematode infective juveniles penetrate into the body cavity of larva or pupa vianatural openings such as mouth, anus and spiracles (breathing pores). Infective juveniles of Heterorhabditis nematodes can also enter by puncturing the inter-segmental membranes of the host cuticle. Once in the body cavity, infective juveniles of Steinernematid and Heterorhabditid nematodes release symbiotic bacteria, Xenorhabdus spp. and Photorhabdus spp., respectively from their gut in the blood of small hive beetle larva/pupae. In the blood, multiplying nematode-bacterium complex causes septicemia and kill mature larvae and/or pupae of small hive beetles usually within 48 hours after infection. Nematodes feed on multiplying bacteria, mature into adults, reproduce and then emerge as infective juveniles from the small hive beetle larval or pupal cadavers to seek new larvae small hive beetle that are already moved from bee hives in the soil for pupation.
    http://blog.bugsforgrowers.com/natur...l-hive-beetles
    While the information above comes from a vendor of the nematodes, other sources also support this idea. Here's one from UC Davis:
    http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/files/147986.pdf
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nige.Coll View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earwig


    these eat varroa.

    It is important to note whether there are any ants or earwigs present, since these insects eat varroa mites and can falsify the mite count obtained.
    (cut from some varroa treatment instruction)
    I have a boat load of Earwigs in my hives.
    Where did you see that they eat Varroa?
    I did not see it in the link you posted, unless Varroa are one of the Arthropods they eat??


    Glen
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Leicester, United Kingdom
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    http://www.bienenwohl.com/eng/fragen.php

    that's one place.
    they are normally the reason people have low varroa drop as they eat them . very easy to get a false reading so to speak.
    not sure how common they are in the usa/canada but they are everywhere in the uk.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nige.Coll View Post
    http://www.bienenwohl.com/eng/fragen.php

    not sure how common they are in the usa/canada but they are everywhere in the uk.
    Like I said I have boat loads of them in my hives when I take the roof off and pop the Inner cover/Crown board, that's when I see them.
    This is interesting!
    Thanks for bringing this up.
    Just went to the link and copied the below statement:

    "Assessing mite infestation from the hive debris
    Number of mites that have dropped by the following morning


    Number of mites
    (approximate)

    Infestation level

    Action


    5-10 mites Low infestation Observe colony, further monitoring treatment
    10-20 mites Medium to substantial infestation Block treatment
    20-30 or more mites Critical infestation Carry out block treatment. Remove two or three capped brood frames from this colony, and replace with broodless comb. Also feed a 1:1 sugar syrup.


    Note: Varroa mites will be removed by any ants or earwigs present in the hive."

    The statement in red in pretty vague. Is that alive Varroa that are removed from the hive or is it the dead ones from the monitoring boards!?!?!? If it's the dead ones from the monitoring board, well that really isn't going to help much.

    Glen
    Last edited by Glen H; 09-06-2013 at 06:00 AM.
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    4,969

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    > they are normally the reason people have low varroa drop as they eat them .

    The link cited does indeed say that earwigs eat varroa:
    Most beehives have a slide-in base, mesh floor and varroa floor. If the hive does not have this system, a sheet of white paper can be covered all over with Vaseline or milking balm and pushed under the colony to serve as a sampling tray during the monitoring period. The mites that drop off then adhere to the sampling tray. It is important to note whether there are any ants or earwigs present, since these insects eat varroa mites and can falsify the mite count obtained.
    http://www.bienenwohl.com/eng/fragen.php


    Pardon me for being skeptical, but I went looking for confirmation from other sources, and found virtually no other sources that suggest that earwigs are varroa predators. Can anyone supply any other references?

    Randy Oliver does mention ants carrying varroa away from a "sticky board":
    Cover the sheet with a sticky substance, so any live mites can’t crawl away—petroleum jelly, Crisco®, or proprietary insect trap resin. Pam® and shelf paper are not sticky enough. You can tell that your stickum is strong enough if the mites stay stuck in rows where they dropped from between the frames (although ants may carry mites away!).

    http://scientificbeekeeping.com/figh...mite-sampling/

    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    >



    Pardon me for being skeptical, but I went looking for confirmation from other sources, and found virtually no other sources that suggest that earwigs are varroa predators. Can anyone supply any other references?


    I have been looking for two days on the internet and have found nothing that clearly states that earwigs kill Varroa. Removing them from a bottom board, could be just already dead ones!?!?

    Glen
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  13. #53

    Default Re: Varroa Mites predator?



    Chelifer at work. There is a guy on Germany who is working on it. Seems promising with 200+ chelifers per hive. Special habitats in the hive are needed.

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