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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default Varroa Mites predator?

    I read in an article that the Varroa Mite orginally came from Siberia. Does the mite have any natural predators in the area of origin?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,541

    Default

    I've read that Tropilaelaps will do a pretty good job on the Varroa...and then the bees.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default cure

    The cure would probably be worse than the disease.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,584

    Default

    Pseudoscorpions will eat Varroa.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default tolerate

    Will the honey bee tolerate this fellow?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    For those who aren't familiar with pseudoscorpions
    (like me) here's an info link.

    Pseudoscorpion


    Interesting little critter........

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,541

    Default

    Rarely, I see them in my hives. Randy Oliver and I saw one in October when he was here. Very small ones...like the pic of the Book Pseudoscorpion on Sundances post. From what few I've seen here, I would doubt they could hurt bees, or mites.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Kanosh,Utah
    Posts
    166

    Default Pseudoscorpion

    The October 2006 ABJ has an article by Dr. Barry Donovan and Dr. Flora Paul on using the pseudoscorpion for mite control as well as wax moth and SHB.

    Blessed Bee
    Doug
    May the Great Spirit watch over you as long as the grass grows and the water flows.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default How to provide nesting

    How would someone go about provide nesting for Pseudoscorpions?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Algonquin, IL, USA
    Posts
    638

    Default


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Default

    if they do all of that, why couldn't they also eat young bee larva? I wouldn't put anything in my hives but bee's!
    Ted

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,584

    Default

    >Will the honey bee tolerate this fellow?

    They seem to. I've never put any in my hives but I started finding them now and then a couple of years ago. If you treat for mites you will surely kill them.

    As for where Varroa originated, it did not originate in Siberia. That is simply one of the earliest places that European honey bees (Apis mellifera) encountered Varroa as it was originally only on Apis cerana.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default Varroa

    I Googled "Varroa originated" and found another source saying it came from southeast Asia.

    I had googled it before and it said Siberia.

    Either way if I understand you correctly it jumped species and spread into managed hives of European Bees.

    Why or how does the Apis cerana deal with the mites.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Kanosh,Utah
    Posts
    166

    Default Nesting

    From the afore mentioned article "beehives might need to be modified to provide nooks and crannies secure from the bees as protected refuges and breeding sites. Interior surfaces of roofs, walls, and floorboards could be scoured with saw cuts, and even a frame could be replaced with a specially-designed psuedoscorpion breeding frame."

    Blessed Bee
    Doug
    May the Great Spirit watch over you as long as the grass grows and the water flows.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,584

    Default

    >Why or how does the Apis cerana deal with the mites.

    They are small cell bees.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lucedale,Ms
    Posts
    34

    Default

    also they contantly groom themselves.and they do not use old wax,constantly build new wax

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default ABJ article

    I had trouble finding a copy of the article.

    Does anyone have one?

    As far as I could tell the archives of the ABJ were not recent enough.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Default

    Those same nooks and crannies that might provide pseudoscorpions hiding places might also provide small hive beetles with places to hide.

    I'd be surprised if pseudoscorpions could provide any real control of Varroa. Such control would require the pseudoscorpions to be preying in comb where the mites are reproducing, or the pseudoscorpions would have to be actively hunting on bees themselves. No harm in having some pseudoscorpions in your hives (although I associate them with rotting wood, so I'd wonder about what might have attracted them), but I doubt they would provide much control as a primary control method for Varroa.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,398

    Default

    Do these puesoscorpions remind anyone of doodle bugs aka ant lions?
    De Colores,
    Ken

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default In check

    The sources I have found indicates they like beetle larvae also.

    I don't think it would be a cure but if it could hold the mites in check I would think it might prevent major damage to the hive.

    The Pseudoscorpion has a long life span and produces a large brood (2 to 50) every three weeks.

    I'm not sure of the number mites a Pseudoscorpion can eat. Does anyone have any idea?

    I would love to see the article.

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