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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Winchester, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Identifying Winter Bee Losses

    Weather in the 60's today. I went to see how many bees were flying out. In 5 hives there was no action, so I checked inside. They were ALL dead! What surprised me was that all 5 hives had full Medium supers of Honey on them. So I checked the supers and in 3 of them a mouse or mice had eaten holes thru 2 frames in each super . My question is? Would a mouse cause the bees not to move up in the hive and take the honey. I have had 15 to 20 hives the past 8 years and have never seen this before. Any Ideas would be helpful. I do use entrance reducers and hives are in good condition.

    KGreen

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    my queens have started laying. perhaps they got stuck protecting brood and starved rather than leave them. good luck,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,985

    Default

    kgreen ask:
    My question is? Would a mouse cause the bees not to move up in the hive and take the honey.

    tecumseh:
    imho no.

    at your location and most especially given the winter you have experienced this year a reduced hive entrance would have been a big plus. Especially with stores on top I would have dissected the hive fairly throughly looking for cause(s). At this point mike haney's explanation for the demise of these hives is the most likely (and simplist) explanation.

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