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Thread: Woohoo!!!!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Urbana, IA
    Posts
    294

    Default Woohoo!!!!!!

    The last few days here in Eastern Ia. have been in the upper 30s and mid 40s. I went out to check the hives and was very pleasently suprised that all 4 hives were active and seem to be doing great. No signs of Nosema either! all the droppings looked fine, no runny stuff seen. This is good for me cause I lost my hives last year over the winter.
    I did do some feeding to give them a boost and I think I will get some pollen patties ordered to try to help them along.
    Hows everyone elses hives doing? I hope well!
    I am so anxious for spring to come so the girls can really get busy!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    McKean County, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Glad to hear all is well with your bees. Checked mine yesterday, found 2 dead 12 doing well and with nice heft when I lifted the backs up, and one that was light. I took a full deep off the one dead one (they swarmed late due to beek inexperience) and put it over the inner cover on the light one, hope I didn"t screw up there.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Urbana, IA
    Posts
    294

    Default

    I didnt try to check hive weight. I've been a little down in the back the last few days. Took a spill on the ice and twisted it a little.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Chittenango,Ny (upstate)
    Posts
    309

    Default

    Checked 13 hives yesterday and found 3 dead. One for sure starved, other two I'm not sure about. I will dig through them when the weather gets warmer. I still needed snowshoes to get to them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Default

    Don’t start to feed pollen patties to early. Only start pollen patties just prior to your natural pollen sources availability. And once you start continue until you see them bring in pollen on there own.
    The reason, they will start to raise brood in high gear once they have pollen to feed the brood. If to early they will start consuming there food reserves at a much faster rate and could starve if the weather turns foul late in winter. Most bee hives starve around early March in our climate . Your hives are probably starting to raise small patches of brood but will control the rate because of pollen availability.
    Beekeepers stimulate brood rearing by feeding pollen substitutes a few weeks prior to natural bloom to take advantage of better pollination. I do this for my blueberries because they bloom early in the season. But if you start to early the results can be catastrophic. Feeding sugar or syrup when the weather is warm enough is ok but timing is everything when it comes to pollen substitute.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Mountain Camp plus a Mann Lake pollen patty.

    This works. Ernie
    Last edited by Barry; 02-08-2009 at 10:16 PM. Reason: image too large
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,592

    Default

    Reduce the file size Ernie.
    Regards, Barry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Urbana, IA
    Posts
    294

    Default

    thanks for the advice on the pollen patties. I'll just keep up with the sugar for now.
    I think theres still alot of winter left!

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