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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    berkley county, WV
    Posts
    429

    Default Early Colony Removal

    I've had several people ask me to remove hives from building this winter. How can I remove them and give them the best chance of surviving until the weather warms? The temperature is between 40 F in the day and 20 F in the night right now.

    I haven't committed to removing any right now, but I am looking for ideas.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Default

    I would try to put it off until early spring, like when dandelions are just starting. That shouldn't be too far away and is about the perfect time to do that kind of thing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    JACKSON OHIO
    Posts
    479

    Default

    wait until april then feed feed feed

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    berkley county, WV
    Posts
    429

    Default

    I am trying, but one of the people pulled the inside wall down to remodel, and found the bees. says he doesn't want to kill them, but wants them gone soon, so he can finish remodeling the room by the end of the month. (I think he has already killed them with this temp, he has the heat off and the windows open). If they can be saved, I was wondering how.....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    Leave them bee until mid to late April

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigbore View Post
    I am trying, but one of the people pulled the inside wall down to remodel, and found the bees. says he doesn't want to kill them, but wants them gone soon, so he can finish remodeling the room by the end of the month. (I think he has already killed them with this temp, he has the heat off and the windows open). If they can be saved, I was wondering how.....
    IMO, if you remove them now, they are probably a lost cause. I have done more than a hundred removals in the last couple of years, and in the case where the property owner insisted that the hive be removed during the winter (which has only been a few), I have yet to have one survive and I believe that my winters here are milder than yours. I still do removals in the winter if they insist and I try to salvage the colony, but I also make sure that my fee is adequate to cover my efforts since I am pretty certain that the colony will not make it.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    JACKSON OHIO
    Posts
    479

    Default

    If the owner is going to kill them anyway then the forcast for this weekend and early next week may be your only option it is worth a try to cut them outas they are going to bee killed anyway.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Middlesex NC
    Posts
    75

    Default

    I would tell him that I'm a BeeKeeper not a Bee Killer and that it is not possible to remove them now without killing them. If you can make it worthwhile money wise to you I would do it but if not worth it money wise I would tell him to have fun and clean up his own mess.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    Ask him to wait until April and you will take them out, make sure he did not try in the past to kill them by spraying them, if so you don't want them. If you are new then it is a fun challenge, after that you figure $75 and a phone call gets you bees to the post office. I charge to remove everything except swarms anymore.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    berkley county, WV
    Posts
    429

    Default

    these would be #2 and 3 for me. I enjoyed the first one, even though it took me a day to do. The bees were ferel, and were very gentle. I went into winter with 4 hives this winter, the removed colony being one. It is the only one flying right now, 2 died, and the last one is still questionable, so I am glad to get them, but if I am going after them, I want them to survive to grow and establish themselves.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    I understand, my first extraction was a trap out and I spent $250 in gas and supplies over 7 weeks removing the bees. The following year that hive died and I did not get the first drop of honey frome them. So looking back I could have purchased 4 packages of bees without any labor and if one died I still had 3 more. People will think they are doing you a favor for letting you get the bees out of their house and it is the opossite. There is nothing wrong with getting them out for free if it makes you feel good.

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