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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    164

    Default Viscosity of Honey

    Can someone tell me what the viscosity of honey is? I realize that this changes with moisture content and temperature. Let's say room temperature at 17% and 120 degrees at 17%.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,235

    Default

    I kind of doubt that anyone actually knows the viscosity of honey. It would generally be measured by "timing" the rate of flow, for a specific volume, through a specific hole. I know that for spray painting they make a little cup with a small hole. You fill the cup and see how many seconds it takes to empty.

    If I were to apply that to honey I imagine that at room temp/17% it would take 2-3 minutes to empty. At 120F/17% it would empty in 3-5 seconds.

    Sorry that we cannot be of more help -- Fuzzy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Do honeys from different nectars affect viscosity? In "The beekeepers handbook" it mentions thixotropy as one of the properties of honey and how the thixotropic properties of honey change according to nectar sources. If that is the case, then wouldn't that affect the viscosity of honey?

    Here is the quote from "The beekeepers handbook" by Diana Sammato and Alphonse Avitabile
    http://www.amazon.com/Beekeepers-Han...3514932&sr=1-1

    "A few rare honeys have thixotropic characteristics. A single, particular plant protein imparts this unique property to the honey. In the comb, the honey appears to be solid but cannot be extracted because of its thick, viscous nature. The honey will liquefy, however, if it is subjected to vibration with a special type of extractor or as it is being spread on bread. As soon as the vibration stops, the honey reverts back to a thick, gel-like solid. The most famous thixotropic honey is from ling or heather (Calluna vulgaris), a plant commonly found growing on the moors of Europe. Another is pure grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) honey."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,081

    Default

    When ordering a small pump for the straw machine I'm trying to build, I had to order one capable of moving liquids with a viscosity rating of 1000 Sones. This is pretty thick and at one time, I had a copy of part of their chart. I have no idea what a Sone is, but the company had a list of liquid products and their viscosity rating. Honey is close to 1000 Sones at room temp.

    Now, if you can clear that up further, I'd appreciate it! I work daily with pressures, volumes, U & R values, Delta T's, etc., but not viscosities.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Newport, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default

    Viscosity of most liquids is commonly expressed in centipoise (cP) in science laboratories.
    "Water has a viscosity of 0.0089 poise at 25 C, or 1 centipoise at 20 C."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poise
    I have not heard of "Sones" units either.
    Here is a viscosity conversion page:
    http://www.unitconversion.org/unit_c...y-dynamic.html
    Honey is listed here at 2000 cP:
    http://www.verick.com/verick_viscosity.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,081

    Default BoBn

    I have to stand by my CRS misinformed memory again. Centistokes and Centipoise were the terms they used, not Sones. I have no idea where I pulled that one from my memory banks. Sones is a term used to denote sound levels. Bathroom exhaust fans are rated in Sones- the lower the number, the quieter they are.

    My apologies for the memory wahoo.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    Do honeys from different nectars affect viscosity?
    Yes, some jell. Others granulate. Plan for worst case if designing a pump or piping network -- rock hard.

    Everything must come apart easily, and if the system is in a room that can be warmed to 100 degreses F, so much the better.

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