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Thread: What ya learn?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default What ya learn?

    I'm giving a talk on second year expectations. Having been around bees since 1981, I've kind of forgot what it's like to be a rookie.

    My question: What did you learn moving from your rookie year into your second year of beekeeping? What did you wish you knew then that you know now?

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default

    I'm a couple of years removed from my rookie season but I still consider myself to be pretty fresh. :-p

    Really the thing I learned is mostly to use common sense. If something really doesn't look right then well, it probably isn't. On the other hand do go trying to look for problems that are not there.

    Once I got into the "let the bees do what they need to do" mode they did better, and the hobby became a lot more fun.

    K

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I am still in my first year, got my bees in May 2008.
    What I learned is to keep extra equipment on hand. supers,frames,foundation,etc.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Grantsboro, North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Don't go into your hives every day.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fair Grove,MO,USA
    Posts
    1,656

    Default 2nd year deekeeping

    Learn what time of day and weather conditions to open your hive. learn to use less smoke and be more gentle when you open and inspect your hive.Learn to work your frames from the outside, to the the middle and when you find larva and fresh eggs you don't have to find the queen.Learn what to look for in your inspection and don't leave the hive open any longer than necessary.These are the ones that helped me,you'll learn more with time. Jack

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    mineral county,Montana USA
    Posts
    798

    Default

    take the time to suit up.it allows more relaxed longer visits to the yard,and into the hives.find people who's advise you trust and use them.plan for expansion but focus on what you have.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro,Ohio
    Posts
    193

    Default

    Don't bite off more than you can chew!!!!!!
    life is like a box of chocolates,you never know what you are gonna get

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Montgomery county, Illinois
    Posts
    423

    Default

    When to treat for pests and how to keep your hive alive through the winter.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northeast Missouri
    Posts
    93

    Default

    I have kept bees a while but not seriously until a few years ago, here is my 2 cent.

    Defiantly extra equipment before you need it and if you like going out and looking at the bee's alot have one hive for each day so you do not disturb them too much.

    Defiantly join a association or club, networking and asking simple question takes a lot of doubt out of your beekeeping.

    Be careful not to spend more time with your bee's than your wife.

    Let nature take its course, sometimes you just can't save them all and it could be for the greater good that they fail.

    Someone will always do something better than you do. Ask yourself if it is worth the extra time. If you have a small hobby op like me the extra time is not a factor and can add to the enjoyment of beekeeping.

    Do not be afraid to try something different than the main stream, just don't use all your colonies when trying it.

    Have fun, you can not obsess over catching every swarm or preventing every swarm. That can take the fun out of it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    Who would you be "defying" by,.. "defiantly" joining a association or club, networking and asking simple questions"? Your wife?? Watch that,..'networking'.

    I would,.. 'definitely' join a association/club if there is one nearby and 'definitely' 'spend time with your wife by asking her to come along, .

    >>> 1. Get metal mouse guards on early enough. 2. Read about and understand swarming because it likely happens in second year. 3. Understand about 'adequate ventilation'; both for summer and winter. 4. Be aware of honey flows in your area; be prepared. 5. Know how much winter stores are necessary for your area. <<.
    Last edited by Oldbee; 01-30-2009 at 07:57 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Port Orchard, WA USA
    Posts
    208

    Default

    My question: What did you learn moving from your rookie year into your second year of beekeeping? What did you wish you knew then that you know now?
    Pay attention to your mite load.

    Have more than one hive.

    When re-queening a queenless hive, wear a good bee suit, or have a couple days vacation planned.....(Six whacks to the kneecap-couldn't bend my leg for two days!)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Don't just have extra equipment, have it in your truck when you visit the yard. Carry stuff you don't think you will need, because you will need it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,589

    Default Expect Robbing your 2nd year... (like the first)

    This doesn't have anything to do with 2ND year expectations... it's more about 1ST year shortcomings.

    I'm still wet behind my 55 year old (beekeeping) ears... but if I had been able to identify the robbing that was occurring it would have improved my colony's chances of making it till spring.

    I think that the bees could adapt or make up for a lot of other errors that we humans make, but not being able to help them with robbing is unfortunate.
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lavaca county, Texas
    Posts
    497

    Default

    1.) Find a good online beekeeping forum for the wealth of information available, hand holding, and to find out how many other people have already asked your "stupid" question.

    2.) Be ready to answer questions when total strangers find out you're a beek. And develop patience so you can listen to all the stories of "african" bees -- had to be, it flew right by my hat (one time) and I nearly got stung!

    3.) Consider your reading material carefully. I discovered a lot of the printed info out there is geared to a far more northerly clime than mine.

    4.) Take it all with a grain of salt. I have (so far) had no, or very few mites, but SHB, fire ants, and wax moths especially have kept me hopping. Was not at all prepared for that.

    5.) Did not know this would become a vocation, a love, a part of my soul.


    Summer

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    winston salem, NC
    Posts
    64

    Default

    i have learned that the night that it was 7 degrees here i should not have worried about them so much and my wife and i both have learned -maybe not enough- but enough to decide no chemicals and if they live they live and if they die then thats right too - just get new ones or in our second year learn how to split and let them raise a queen on their own even if it means losing a little honey - hope to learn the best way to collect and jug the honey and the money - that way maybe this dang hobby is not so expensive to do

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