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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Carver County, MN, USA
    Posts
    12

    Post Outdoor Super Storage?

    In his book The Backyard Beekeeper, Kim Flottum suggests storing supers on a simple rack outdoors. The rack has a roof to protect the supers from rain, but no walls. The idea is to store the supers to allow light and air in, and discourage wax moths.

    Has anyone tried this method? Are there any drawbacks? Indoor storage space is increasingly limited for me, and this would be a very cheap way of adding storage space.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    329

    Default

    I have not tried this method, but one thing I would do in any case is to put the supers upside down on the racks. That way, should some rain come in, it will not collect in the cells and ferment with any honey remaining in the combs. I've had this happen when leaving supers outside.

    justgojumpit

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    One of biggest reason to store outside is to avoid wax moth infestations which are rampant if you store supers inside in dark or semi-dark areas without constant policing and moth crystals. Storage outside in the light helps extend that moth free season. The upside will include capturing swarms in the equipment which otherwise would pass on by. I ususally have about 3 swarms move into our honey super stacks the day before I have to load them on the truck and super up. What fun!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Falconer, NY
    Posts
    206

    Wink

    My Dad always kept his supers on racks he built on the side of a chicken coop. The coop roof over hung the supers. He put the bottom supers on fly screen covered queen excuders to keep bugs and mice out. He put pieces of plywood or what ever he could scratch up on the tops and sealed up holes with duct tape. Every now and then he would add a little wax moth stuff. I have a similar but a little more protected set up. His was probably better.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,139

    Default

    I store used boxes on top of pallets and migratory covers outside with a cover on top and then cover multiple hives with those inexpensive 6 x 10' tarps from lowes, which are 8' x 10' I think)....stack a few bricks or stones on top to keep the tarp secured...with these cold temps (down to -20+) at times...the wax moths aren't an issue. I just try to keep the mice out.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Sacramento Ca
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Yes I do. This is my first year doing it. I got the Idea from a very popular natural beekeeper named Serge Labesque who had an article published in Bee Culture July 2004.
    Serge built a rack out of cinder blocks,2x4's,4 plastic pipes,and tin roofing. The rack was put together in such a way that the 2x4's put close together on the bottom and then the next levels they were placed apart so when you set the suppers on it they would lean to the outside (like leaning against a wall in a "V" pattern). This design Serge came up with held 20 supers 10 each level. I will see if I can find the article.
    I have had good results so far.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Carver County, MN, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Thanks for the replies!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,162

    Default

    I read someone put an extension ladder on saw horses, setting them in the V with space between each supper. It's in one of my beginner books.
    Dan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    {with these cold temps (down to -20+) at times...the wax moths aren't an issue.}

    I don't worry about wax moths usually until the end of May and most of our equipment is afield by then. We do always seem to have a 10 or so hive bodies and supers in need of repair with combs in them in the equipment yard through the summer.

    Incidentally our Russian customers in NYC are always asking us for live wax moth larvae so they can breed there own. I know they are making something medicinal, like with the fresh dead bees, but I'm just too afraid to ask what!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    329

    Default

    some people eat wax moth larvae. personally, I would not be too interested in breeding them, although you can!

    justgojumpit

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    norman,ok
    Posts
    5

    Default remember this

    just remember that wax moths don't infest comb that hasn't had larve in. keep the queen from laying in them and no worries about moths.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Sacramento Ca
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Incidentally our Russian customers in NYC are always asking us for live wax moth larvae so they can breed there own. I know they are making something medicinal, like with the fresh dead bees, but I'm just too afraid to ask what!
    I know out here they use wax moth Larvae for fishing. Its is some of the best bait you can use.

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