Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Monte Vista, CO 81144
    Posts
    244

    Default There's Gold in Dem Dair Almonds

    Reading all the posts on Almond (amond) pollenation cracks me up. It seems like there is a whole new generation of beeks the past 2 years that swears they are going to strike it rich in the almonds. Split all of their bees all summer, screw honey, and strike it rich in Californ-I-A. Unfortunately almond farming, like beekeeping, is a form of agricultrure and subject to good and bad years. Not quite sure why beekeepers have this notion that all almond farmers are richer than God. When the price of nuts are high, and there is a shortage of bees, the beeks will get outstaning rates with average quality bees and probably nothing will be said. However, when nut prices are low, and there is even a slight surplus of bees, you can be your bottom that the grower is going to want every frame he/she paid for. So, just a word for beeks on their first or even second year in the almonds......don't send junk. If there is any question about strength while grading the bees at home or in a holding yard, combine it or kick it out. Sending bad bees will cost you more in the long run through bad reputation, tranportation, and broker headache than you will recoup.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    Word is that there is a surplus of bees for almonds this year, and that anyone planning on going should make sure they have a solid deal.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Almonds

    Why are they Almonds when they're on the tree and A monds when they are not?


    Because you have to knock the "ell" out of em to get em off!

    I think the two previous posts are very accurate.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
    Posts
    312

    Sad Surplus ?

    I would not say their is a surplus yet. Have spoke with multiple beeks ( more than a handful) in the past 2 days. As they are now gradeing bees, consistantly picking up 20 to 25% of hives sent to ca wintering yards.

    Larry

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,347

    Default Grading

    Larry:

    I'm not sure what you mean by "picking up". Are you saying 20-25% are dead and are being "picked up" off the pallet and put on a truck with the other deadouts. Or is it 20-25% are weak and will not make grade? If so 2 could be combined into 1 ,so in fact there is a 10-12.5% loss, which is kinda expected. Comments would be appreciated, because if 20-25% are dead that could certainly tip the balance in a twisted sort of way for the beekeepers (only of course for those who have live colonies).

    Jean-Marc

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
    Posts
    312

    Default Combination

    Its a combonatiojn of both, a lot of empty boxes(dead outs) and some 1 & 2 framers. But the reality is for every 1000 hives that came to CA, about 750 to 800 are rentable.

    Larry

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
    Posts
    401

    Default

    AAAAMEN.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Alot of talk on this forum,back in september about big dollars, did not help the industry one bit.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,162

    Default Conversely

    Talk of exceedingly low dollars doesn't help either. Growers love it when beeks get panicky and cut their own throats.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,201

    Default

    very well said, post's 1-9.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,459

    Default Grading

    In regards to putting two small ones together to make one good rentable unit. Our procedure is to find what we call an "engine", which is something in the 5 to 6 comb range that is actively cleaning up pollen patties and combining that with something in the four or less comb range. Our experience is that two small hives combined more often than not just don't make one good hive unless you have got that engine or bigger hive to pull it along.

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