Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Hfcs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
    Posts
    314

    Default Hfcs

    I have a question, how many pounds of HFCS is in a 55 gallon drum? I found it for .25 cents a pound and was wondering ???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,168

    Default

    I think it depends on the type, there are several formulations, but about 10# a gallon. I prefer liquid sucrose over HFCS myself. I have seen many studies that show that bees live much longer on sucrose.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    There are recent studies of various varieties of HFCS, and some came out really bad, and some OK, I believe.

    Diana Sammatoro at the Tucson lab was doing the work, I believe. You might want to check with her. http://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov/home/...aro/index.html

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
    Posts
    314

    Default

    what is the price diffrence between HFCS and Sucrose ? And is it as easy to come by as HFCS. I have allways mixed my own sugar and water. But with and increase to 50 hives the sugar is getting expensive.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    The price difference depends on the source and the quantity and how many middlemen are involved. Also remember that with HFCS you are buying some water, typically close to 20% as I recall (And I have bought truckloads).

    Two years ago, there were heavy losses in California that beekeepers blamed on HFCS they bought through a reputable bee supply channel. Before that, in Western Canada tens of thousands of colonies died due to bad HFCS.

    I have never heard of colonies dying from sugar syrup, although if it is burnt by applying too much direct heat while mixing on the farm, it can become harmful.

    Sugar can usually be bought at wholesalers and beekeepers typically leave word that they will buy broken bags and swept-up sugar if it is not contaminated. I've heard that beekeepers can get some really good deals if they 'prime the pump' with a little honey in the right hands.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
    Posts
    314

    Default

    Thanks for the advise. I will probley keeping buying sugar. I never thought about checkin with super market on busted bags. Good idea !!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Default Hfcs

    Used it for years with no trouble.
    Only use the 55% never the 45%.
    Also we get a " spec " sheet for the batch & tanker load.
    By the way only use " food grade " HFCS.
    Yes there is a lot of off label stuff out there, beware!!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Swalwell, AB
    Posts
    579

    Default

    Yes, I quite liked it, but, particularly at times of year in climates where bees cannot fly or raise brood, beekeepers tend to be wary. My friends who rely on their bees for their living gladly pay a bit more for pre-mixed sugar syrup.

    Also, there are several suppliers and processes and it is apparently the acid treatment that causes bee problems. The enzyme process id supposed to be OK. Too technical for me, but Dr. Currie in Manitoba did a lot of work on it and now Diana has tackled it. http://wordpress.beesource.com/2008/...r-oct-10-2008/ One thing I heard is that good HFCS should be the colour of tap water (No color).

    Even the 'food grade' HFCS can vary a lot in composition and that is what caused the recent problems AFAIK. I talked personally to a guy in Central California who lost pretty well all of his 1,000+ colonies.

    Ask yourself. Do I feel lucky today?

    Google Diana Sammataro High Fructose

    Other Hayden Bee Lab research is focused on the physiological effects of feeding high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to bees. The product may be harmless to bees but no one is absolutely sure, DeGrandi-Hoffman said. HFCS from different manufacturers and distributors is under the microscope.

    Researchers are checking HFCS for any impact caused by temperature during HFCS shipping, as well as the actual shipping containers. The Hayden facility’s Blaise Leblanc is pursuing the chemistry angle while Diana Sammataro is exploring bee behavior and the effects on bee physiology.

    The lab is lacking actual HCFS product delivered to beekeepers. Beekeepers are asked to send HCFS samples to the lab to check for possible contaminants. For more information, contact Sammataro at (520) 670-6380, ext. 121 or diana.sammataro@ars.usda.gov.
    Last edited by Allen Dick; 01-21-2009 at 04:50 PM. Reason: Addition

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
    Posts
    314

    Default

    No I don't want to gamble on saving a few bucks. The supplier is Rossman in Moultrie Ga. I found feel with his reputation that only good high quality product wold coe from there. I will get better details when I go there Friday to pick up supers.....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Ohio
    Posts
    870

    Default Hfcs Sugar Blend

    I get a HFCS sugar blend from Cowgills and pay $.25 a pound, and have had no problem for the last 10 years. The barrel of sryup that I get are 640 pounds.
    Ron

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    souris, manitoba, canada
    Posts
    787

    Default who is Cowgills?

    I get a HFCS sugar blend from Cowgills and pay $.25 a pound, and have had no problem for the last 10 years. The barrel of sryup that I get are 640 pounds.
    Ron

    Cowgills, is that Cargill?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Ohio
    Posts
    870

    Default

    Yes that is cargill and not cowgill.
    Ron

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads