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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Lancaster CA
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    410

    Default Do chemicals in beeswax affect queens,drones?

    At a Cal State research lunchon a few years back, the program was about chemical residue in wax and it's effects on queens and drones. The research showed that chem residue caused queens to supersede and drones to shoot blanks. Some folks in the audience were refuting much of the data. It was suggested that queen producers ( lots of them in the audience ), should have their combs tested. Supersedure is a major problem now. Is there a link? I know for a fact that getting 100 bad queens sure ruins your day.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Kirkland, WA, USA
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    1,020

    Default

    Is it possible for a drone to shoot blanks? Wouldn't it require that the drone be malformed from the moment the drone emerges? Supersedure I can certainly believe. It would be fascinating to know if it was due to a drop in the trace phermones that help supress it or if it were for other chemical qualities.
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lancaster CA
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    410

    Default

    To be more clenical. The researcher stated that the sperm from the affected drones was steril. The drones would copulate but the queen would receive steril sperm.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
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    1,162

    Default

    There is a great article by J Berry in this months Bee Culture. Seems like the evidence is pretty solid from the studies and research that I have seen and could explain some of the supersedure problems and shorter lifespan of queens.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
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    2,479

    Default

    Marla Spivak gave a very interesting review of the work of one of her grad students at the AHPA conv in Fresno this year, looking at larval development in coumaphos & fluvalinate contaminated comb. The larva take longer and irregular amounts of time to mature, creating those weak, scattered brood patterns we've been seeing. Looks just like a failing queen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fair Grove,MO,USA
    Posts
    1,665

    Default chemicals or varroa

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Marla Spivak gave a very interesting review of the work of one of her grad students at the AHPA conv in Fresno this year, looking at larval development in coumaphos & fluvalinate contaminated comb. The larva take longer and irregular amounts of time to mature, creating those weak, scattered brood patterns we've been seeing. Looks just like a failing queen.
    I would think, varroa on the drone larva would have more of an effect in putting the maturing drone in a weaken state.A sickly weakened drone would not be up to par in my opinion.We think that a queen wouldn't mate with one like that,but over time, maybe our drones are becoming weaker, and our queens don't have much choice. This along with chemicals in the comb, no wonder were having supercedure queens.Just my opinion. Jack

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Queen weight

    It was reported in the ABJ that there was a direct correlation of the emerged queens weight to the wax contamination %.
    I use to us the wide based cell cup. But, I changed over to the plastic cell cups.
    Queen breeders are puting the pierco drone based frames into their drone mothers to prevent sterilr drones. I know of a queen breeder that puts out over 500 of the Pierco drone frames annualy for high quaility drones.
    I will have my drone frames in place soon for this season.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Auger Hole, MN
    Posts
    433

    Default

    jjgbee said" Some folks in the audience were refuting much of the data. It was suggested that queen producers ( lots of them in the audience ), should have their combs tested. Supersedure is a major problem now. Is there a link?"

    kinda makes you wonder why some folks even attend the meetings if they have no respect for researchers and scientific data.


    The Effects of Miticides on the Reproductive Physiology of Honey Bee
    (Apis mellifera L.) Queens and Drones
    Lisa Marie Burley

    http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/ava...d/lmburley.pdf

    I have no doubt in my mine that supercedure problems from purchased mated queens are correlated with fluvalinate and compaphous contamination.

    Ray Olivarez has a good understanding of the issues and his queens are highly regarded as being good layers by several big operations. Unfortunately his genetics have not been selected for any real mite resistance.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    174

    Default

    It would only make sense that chemicals would impact drones and queens. If you contaminate the living environment of any living creature you're going to see some negative side effects. Now it is possible that it is difficult to establish a scientific causal link - unless you spend considerable sums of money to research and explain just how this happens. The tobacco companies used this logic to fly in the face of common sense, saying in the 50's through the 70's that there was no scientific proof that smoking caused lung cancer. Technically, they were right at the time, but now science has shown what common sense knew for decades - smoking is a direct cause of lung cancer.

    So obviously - chemicals in the comb can have an serious impact on drones, queens and workers.

    Quote Originally Posted by jjgbee View Post
    At a Cal State research lunchon a few years back, the program was about chemical residue in wax and it's effects on queens and drones. The research showed that chem residue caused queens to supersede and drones to shoot blanks. Some folks in the audience were refuting much of the data. It was suggested that queen producers ( lots of them in the audience ), should have their combs tested. Supersedure is a major problem now. Is there a link? I know for a fact that getting 100 bad queens sure ruins your day.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,945

    Default

    Where can we have foundation tested for contaminants?

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