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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Shelby, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Any Good Bee Books?

    Last week I read “A Book of Bees” by Sue Hubbell. I had heard of this book and had seen it referenced many times in other books. It’s a very good book. Nice and light with plenty of hard facts and solid ideas. I think even folks not into beekeeping would enjoy it. I found myself nodding my head and smiling a lot when reading this book. This is the type of book I like to read in the winter when there’s not much you can do with the bees. There were a couple 3 or 4 parts that were a little too soft for me, but don’t let that keep you from reading it. Its only a couple of hundred pages and well worth the time. I only wish I had read it sooner.

    I have another bee book here I was planning on reading but I can’t remember the name and I’m too lazy to get up and look. I got sidetracked this weekend rereading one of my favorite fishing books but the temperature is dropping here again so I should have plenty of time this week to get it done and get back to you.

    Any one else reading anything good?

    Michael

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    might I suggest Richard Taylor 'the Joy of Beekeeping'.

    not too long, reads nicely, lots of information.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,887

    Default

    I really liked Bees in America; How the honey bee shaped a nation. by Tammy horn.

    I barrowed it from the library a couple of years ago and have since bought my own copy.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    I like bees by Dr Karl Von Frisch

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Madison County, Alabama
    Posts
    487

    Default

    Highly recommend any book by Dr. Lawrence J. Connor (Bee Sex Essentials and Increase Essentials). But, in particular, is a book I'm proud to own and I find a good read and very informative -- Hive Management by Richard Bonney. Hive Management was published in the 90's and is not very up to date with today's challenges of mites, but his chapters on making splits gives good insight to the hobbyist or sideliner on the value of paying attention to thinking ahead. The underlying theme of Bonney's book is what you do today, should shape where you want your hive to be in the next 3-4 months.
    "...the most populous colonies ...are provided by queens ...in the year following their birth." Brother Adam

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ruston, LA USA
    Posts
    3

    Default My first book

    When I was in high school my first beekeeping book was "First Lessons in Beekeeping" by Dadant. I still have it, and it's very worn. I still like to pull it out from time to time, more for nostalgia than anything else.

    My second book was "The Beekeeper's Handbook" by Roger Morse.

  7. #7

    Default Dr. Connors books

    I also highly recommend Increase Essentials and Bee Sex essentials, they are definately my favorite. I reference these two books all the time. I am currently reading "50 Years among the Bees" by C.C. Miller and have been enjoying that book as well. "Hive Management" by Richard Bonney is also a well written book that takes you through the seasons and what the author recommends you should be doing with the bees at each time of the year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,500

    Default

    "A year's work in an out apiary" by GM Doolittle
    "Beekeeping at Buckfast Abbey" by Brother Adam

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

    Default

    "At the hive entrance" by H. Storch and
    "Bees: Their Vision, Chemical Senses and Language" by Karl von Frisch.

    The latter sounds hideously dry, but is actually a good read and fascinating.
    Last edited by Hobie; 01-19-2009 at 06:50 AM. Reason: typo
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Mount Joy, PA, USA
    Posts
    43

    Default

    "Allen Latham's BEE BOOK" Interesting read about beekeeping in the late 1800s and early 1900s. A great idea from the book is a slice of comb honey on a fresh baked hotdog roll that he would sell at fairs.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Shelby, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Must Read

    I just read “Fruitless Fall” by Rowan Jacobson, subtitled “The Collapse of the Honey Bee and the Coming Agricultural Crisis“. The title and sub pretty much tell it all. I really enjoyed this book. The author uses CCD to tell the story of bees and their connection to our everyday life. This is a book that all beekeepers should read and recommend to people not in the hobby. Only a couple hundred pages and well worth your time.

    Michael

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kerikeri, New Zealand
    Posts
    69

    Default

    Many good reccomendations already given. I just added The Buzz about Bees: Biology of a superorganism by Jurgen Tautz to my bee library. It's fantastic with loads of amazing photos by Helga Heilmann. It's written from a biologists perspective rather than a beeks-- really good science layed out for a common audience. It's full of great info, but worth buying for the photos alone.

    dw

  13. #13

    Smile Any good books on bees

    I especially like old bee books. Fifty Years Among the Bees by CC Miller is in a reprint, you can find it on Amazon and it is got a lot of bee wisdom in it. Another of my favorites is A Living From Bees by Frank Pelett. There are so many good ones. My first favorite was How To Keep Bees and Sell Honey by Walter T Kelley and you can still get it from the Walter T Kelley company for not much money. It has lots of pictures in it. I have over 30 books on beekeeping. Most I have bought used from Amazon or ebay.
    Pastor Mike
    Bee a blessing to God and others.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,684

    Default

    yes, this book is an absolute must read. ...i do wish there were details of the experiments that lead to his conclusions however....and i'm puzzled by the complete lack of mention of the microbes in the hive.

    also, there is a new book by e.o. wilson and another author called "superorganism" about bees and ants....a big fat book.

    deknow

    Quote Originally Posted by danwyns View Post
    Many good reccomendations already given. I just added The Buzz about Bees: Biology of a superorganism by Jurgen Tautz to my bee library. It's fantastic with loads of amazing photos by Helga Heilmann. It's written from a biologists perspective rather than a beeks-- really good science layed out for a common audience. It's full of great info, but worth buying for the photos alone.

    dw

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